News

Statement on Federal Spending Bill from the Associated Medical Schools of New York

AMSNY Applauds Crucial Increases to NIH Budget, Reauthorization of Key Programs

Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO of the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), which represents New York’s 17 medical schools, issued the following statement about the FY2020 federal spending bill passed by congress on Thursday:

“AMSNY is thrilled to see several key provisions included in appropriations legislation which will have very significant, positive impacts on New York’s 17 medical schools and on the state’s bioscience economy at large.

The robust $2.6 billion increase for medical research at the NIH is of particular cause for celebration. This increase allows for a significant opportunity to invest in biomedical research, which is an essential element to New York State’s health care and economic sectors.

Because of its high concentration of world-class research institutions, New York ranks 3rd in the nation for Congressional Districts with NIH awards, and likewise ranks 3rd among states in total NIH funding awards. In FY2018, the $2.632 billion that NY State researchers received from NIH —nearly 7% of total NIH funding—supported more than 32,000 jobs at over 200 institutions throughout New York and led directly to the important advances that drive the state’s bioscience sector.

New York has more medical schools and more medical students than any other state, and AMSNY is intensely committed to strengthening and diversifying the physician workforce. We strongly support the programs funded through Title VII at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and commend Congress for increasing funding to these programs by 8% overall. In particular, several AMSNY members have received grants through the Health Career Opportunity Programs (HCOP) and were very appreciative that this program was funded at $15 million for FY 2020, a 6% increase over FY 2019 funding levels.

Additionally, we are very pleased that Congress has enacted a 10 year reauthorization of the Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute. Since its inception, PCORI has worked to connect patients, clinicians and researchers with critical information they need to make better informed healthcare decisions. This reauthorization will ensure that PCORI is able to fulfil the promise of providing this evidence based research.

AMSNY also supported the inclusion of dedicated funding for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to study gun violence prevention, the first such funding in two decades.”

About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org

 

Press Contact: Jaime@anatgerstein.com, 347-361-7183

 

Introducing AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine Scholarship Recipients for 2019-2020

10 Medical Students Awarded State-Funded Scholarships, Commit to Working in Underserved Areas

The Associated Medical Schools of New York is proud to introduce the 10 recipients of the 2019-2020 AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship, funded by the New York State Department of Health, thanks to support from the New York State Association of Black, Puerto Rican,  Hispanic and Asian Legislators.

The AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship is designed to provide physicians for underserved communities, while decreasing medical students’ debt load by removing financial barriers. 

The scholarship is pegged to the cost of SUNY medical school tuition, and is available to those students who have completed an AMSNY post-baccalaureate program and who commit to work in an underserved area in NYS upon completion of their medical education.

“We are proud to introduce this year’s scholarship awardees, who are each dedicated to improving health care in New York State as future doctors,” said Jo Wiederhorn, CEO of AMSNY.  “Their addition to the physician workforce will help diversify medicine and reduce health disparities, thanks to funding from the New York State Assembly.”

THIRD-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

AKYA MYRIE 
Undergraduate: Stony Brook University, BS (Health Science) ’16
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’17 
Medical School: State University of New York, Downstate College of Medicine, MD, ’21

Akya grew up in Brooklyn, New York, after her mother immigrated from Jamaica to secure better services for her son who is profoundly mentally disabled. Akya learned that while medical care was better in the United States, her mother and brother still struggled to access quality medicine and culturally competent care. This inequity led Akya to pursue a career in medicine but also instilled a drive to serve vulnerable communities and individuals who are chronically underserved. Akya is in Brooklyn starting her third year of medical school, where she has started various community service initiatives, participated in health disparities research projects on diabetes, obesity, and kidney disease, and will be joining a team to aid in a Medical Health Trip to Jamaica, where her roots originate. Akya describes a commitment to serve as an honor, rather than a requirement, and she is excited to work with an underserved community as a gastroenterologist after residency.

DIANA PEREZ 
Undergraduate: University of Connecticut, BS (Biological Science), ’14
Post-Bac: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MS (Medical Training), ’17 
Medical School: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, MD, ’21

Before moving to the Bronx at age 11, Diana lived in the Dominican Republic. After graduating from her eighth grade English as a Second Language (ESL) program, she attended high school without an ESL program and had to quickly learn the English language. In high school, she participated in a summer internship at St. Vincent Medical Center’s Emergency Department. It was through this program that she gained a deeper understanding of how important it is for physicians to provide quality care and to help patients make better health choices. After college, Diana worked as a Perinatal Health Coordinator at the Institute for Family Health providing health education and guidance to low-income pregnant women. Diana says that growing up in the Bronx, one of the poorest counties in the country, lead her to view advocacy and justice as an obligation for healthcare professionals. As a medical student, participating in the Summer Undergraduate Mentorship Program at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, she has learned more about the healthcare disparities affecting her community. Diana is starting her third year at Einstein and looks forward to providing proactive healthcare to underserved areas.

SEBASTIAN PLACIDE 
Undergraduate: Cornell University, BA (Sociology), ’12
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’16 
Medical School: Albert Einstein College of Medicine, MD, ’20

Sebastian grew up in a single-parent home in Brooklyn, New York, where his mother continually sacrificed for his well-being and led him to develop a passion of putting others first at a young age. Throughout high school, he helped translate for his grandmother when she saw the doctor since her physician was not fluent in Haitian-Creole. Even with the language barrier, Sebastian recalls that the physician served as an advocate, healer, and teacher for his grandmother which led him to also pursue a career as a doctor. Sebastian looks forward to serving a medically underserved community because he grew up in one himself and feels it is his duty to return the service. Sebastian is starting his fourth and final year at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. He has been inducted into the Gold Humanism Honor Society and appointed to serve on Einstein’s Medical Education Council, ensuring that the medical school curriculum is culturally sensitive to the diverse patient population of the surrounding Bronx community. Sebastian has a long-term goal of establishing a healthcare center in an underserved area to offer holistic and culturally appropriate care.

SECOND-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

NATASHA BORRERO 
Undergraduate: Yale University, BA (History of Science/History of Medicine), ’07
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’16 
Medical School: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences, MD, ’20

Natasha was born and raised in The Bronx, NY and is currently a fourth-year medical student at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. She spent many years working at a federally qualified health center in the South Bronx before working diligently to get into medical school through the AMSNY Post-Baccalaureate Program. Receiving the Diversity in Medicine scholarship has allowed her to focus less on medical student debt and more on the type of physician she wants to be. During clinical rotations, Natasha enjoyed building relationships with patients and is excited to be applying to Family Medicine Residency Programs. As a family physician, she wants to serve and collaborate with underserved communities in order to improve health outcomes and provide quality care. Natasha is looking forward to finishing medical school and starting her training where she can learn how to best care for patients of all ages.

FIRST-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

ANTÍA ITZEL GÓMEZ
Undergraduate: Pomona College, BA (Spanish), ’09
Doctorate: New York University, PhD (Latin American & Latina/o Literatures and Cultures), ’16
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’19 
Medical School: SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University, MD, ’23

Antía’s interest in becoming a physician emerged from her personal experiences as a transgender Latina and first-generation college student. As a child of Mexican immigrants, Antía grew up in an agricultural town with minimal access to medical care. These experiences led her to pursue health studies and Latina/o literature. During her transition, Antía learned to advocate for herself and built strong relationships with physicians who respected her gender expression and ethnic backgrounds. It was then that she made the decision to pursue a career in medicine. Currently, Antía is a first-year medical student at SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University. As a transgender woman of color with access to the science and practice of medicine, Antía hopes to provide culturally humble patient education, preventative medicine, and disease treatment for those in her communities.

DEASHIA MCALPINE
Undergraduate: Russell Sage College, BA (Psychology), ’15
Post-Bac: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MS (Medical Technology), ’19
Medical School: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’23

Deashia grew up in Brooklyn, New York, where she experienced, first-hand,  healthcare disparities in a medically underserved community. Her passion for medicine was ignited in high school when she participated in the NYU School of Medicine High School Fellows Program. She attended an all-women’s college, where she learned about the inequalities that women face in society, especially in medicine. After college and while applying to medical school, Deashia served as an AmeriCorps volunteer being a patient educator in a women’s homeless shelter and at various homeless shelter clinics throughout NYC. Deashia was offered the opportunity to attend medical school through the AMSNY/Upstate University Medical School’s Master’s in Medical Technology and is currently a first-year student at SUNY Upstate Medical University. These experiences have inspired her to advocate for and serve underserved and underrepresented populations. She looks forward to empowering and to providing comprehensive care to her future patients.

NATHALIE MORALES
Undergrad: State University of New York at Stony Brook, BS (Psychology, Biology, Business Management), ’10
Graduate: Rutgers University Graduate School of Biomedical Sciences, MS (Biomedical Sciences), ’14
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’15 
Medical School: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’20

As the daughter of Ecuadorian immigrants, Nathalie is the first in her family to graduate from college, graduate school, and later this academic year, medical school. Nathalie’s compassion and interest in the care of others was founded though her extensive volunteering experiences serving nursing home residents, at-risk youth, and hospital Emergency Department patients. Her clinical work experiences as a Certified Nurse Assistant (CNA), Surgical Medical Assistant, and Clinical Research Coordinator empowered her to take a proactive approach to healthcare. After graduate school and completing her research thesis on wound healing, Nathalie participated in the AMSNY Post-Bac Program at University at Buffalo, and then began medical school at SUNY Upstate Medical University. During her rotations, she connected with Spanish-speaking patients and realized her passion to treat and advocate for people from backgrounds similar to hers. She is committed to becoming a physician who cares for the underserved while also providing the best medical care regardless of socioeconomic status. Nathalie is currently a fourth-year medical student pursuing a Family Medicine residency with interests in adolescent, reproductive, and immigrant health needs.

MICHAEL OLUWAFEMI OLU-TALABI
Undergraduate: State University of New York at Buffalo, BS (Biological Sciences), ’16
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’18 
Medical School: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’22

Michael realized that his life goal was to become a physician based on his desire to educate and empower those living in underserved communities. Michael grew up in an underserved community in Queens, New York. From an early age, he experienced and observed inequities in the provision of healthcare as a result of a lack of trust between patients and physicians. Michael excelled in his academics and is now a second-year student at SUNY Upstate Medical University. As President of the Student National Medical Association (SNMA) Chapter at Upstate, he leads efforts focused on the needs and concerns of black medical students. He is an active participant in programs such as Safe Spaces and Zhonta House, where he encourages and advises youth of color. This has shaped his goal to use education to serve his patients. He looks forward to delivering comprehensive healthcare and mentorship to those communities especially in need.

SAMANTHA WILLIAMS
Undergraduate: Union College, BS (Biological Sciences), ’18
Post-Bac: University at Buffalo, Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences (AMSNY), ’19 
Medical School: State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’23

Samantha was born and raised in Syracuse, New York, where she has observed throughout her lifetime, how medical care is delivered to an underserved area. Her desire to return to this community as a provider has stemmed from working as a pediatrics volunteer for four years at the Syracuse Community Health Center (SCHC), a federally qualified health center. In Schenectady, New York, Samantha volunteered at the Sunnyview Rehabilitation Center and worked with patients who experienced life-altering, traumatic injuries. She later became an emergency department scribe at Ellis Hospital in hopes of decreasing the burden of documentation for physicians to enhance patient encounters. Samantha has also done research looking at racial disparities in healthcare. Her love for Syracuse and passion for improving its health outcomes was reaffirmed when she chose to attend medical school at SUNY Upstate Medical University where she is now a first-year medical student.

EMELIO WOODSTOCK
Undergraduate: Syracuse University, BS (Psychology; Neuroscience), ’16
Post-Bac: Stony Brook University, MS (Biomedical Sciences), ’18 
Medical School: Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, MD, ’22

As the son of Jamaican immigrants living in an underserved area of the Bronx, NY, Emelio has had first-hand experience in a community that would greatly benefit from physicians of color. Emelio’s interest in medicine started when he lost his grandfather to a preventable illness. Inspired by his mother’s community healthcare activism, Emelio wants to become a healthcare leader treating and educating both patients and the larger community about disease prevention. His clinical experiences serving as an E.M.T. in the greater Syracuse area and also internationally in Cordoba, Argentina, fueled his desire to work with the underserved. As the first in his family and immediate community to attend graduate and medical school, Emelio has navigated through hurdles to excel in his education while working part-time and remaining an active mentor to inner city youth in his community. Emelio is now in his second year at the Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University and looks forward to helping patients in predominantly immigrant-populated, disadvantaged communities in New York State.

 

About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org

Fox 5: NYU’s Groundbreaking Stem Cell Research

By Antwan Lewis
Published 10/30/2019


NYU stem cell research
Stem cells need a “home” to survive. That home is called a niche. Researchers at NYU Langone study special properties of stem cells and the impact they can have in treating diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, various cancers, and others.

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NEW YORK – Stem cells need a “home” to survive. That home is called a niche.

“if you remove the stem cell from the niche, they don’t have their special properties anymore,” said Dr. Erika Bach, who leads a team of researchers at NYU Langone Health.

Bach’s lab studies those special properties of stem cells and the impact they can have in treating diseases like Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, various cancers, and others.

“A doctor can actually best help a patient if they have a really fundamental thorough knowledge of how the disease happens and we can only get important information like this through very basic research,” Bach said.

What makes the Bach lab’s work even more groundbreaking is that they’ve traded Petri dishes for testing on bio-systems with close similarities to humans—in this case, the fruit fly.

“Importantly, 70% of human disease genes have counterparts in flies so that’s another reason that they are a very good model,” Bach said.

The lab’s data is shared with industry colleagues like Dr. Christopher Park, who treats patients who can benefit from the research.

“We know that a lot of the diseases with really devastating consequences for patients. We have therapies for patients but they are really sub-optimal,” Park said. “So the idea would be that if we could bring some of these new therapies, we might be able to make dramatic improvements in how their loved ones do with respect to the diseases and improve the quality of life.”

https://www.fox5ny.com/news/nyus-groundbreaking-stem-cell-research

Bronx News 12: Researchers to educate the public with Stem Cell Awareness Day

Researchers to educate the public with Stem Cell Awareness Day

For more than 15 years, Doctor Eric Bouhassira and his team have been researching stem cells at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. They say their mission is to use stem cells to create new red blood cells.
According to Dr. Bouhassira, the red blood cells could help many. He says it could help someone with sickle cell disease, who sometimes need a very rare blood type, which could be replaced in this way.
One way they are spreading the message is through Stem Cell Awareness Day. They are aiming to educate the public by hosting the event on Wednesday.
Jo Wiederhorn is the president and CEO of the Associated Medical Schools of New York and is advocating for research. The Associated Medical Schools of New York is a non-profit that represents all of the state medical schools.
The work being done in labs across the state involving stem cells in hopes of treating and curing conditions such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and various forms of cancer.
However, researchers say they need a lot of funding because the research is very expensive. They say the federal government no longer supports stem cell research.
Researchers say anything that has advanced the work they have been doing for the past 10 years has come from the state.

Associated Medical Schools of New York’s Diversity in Medicine Programs Receives INSIGHT Into Diversity Magazine’s 2019 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award

National Recognition of Programs That Are Making a Difference for All Underrepresented Groups in the Fields of Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM)

New York, New York—Today, the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY)’s Diversity in Medicine Programs received the 2019 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award from INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, the largest and oldest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education. The Inspiring Programs in STEM Award honors colleges and universities that encourage and assist students from underrepresented groups to enter the fields of science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM). AMSNY will be featured, along with 49 other recipients, in the September 2019 issue of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. 

Inspiring Programs in STEM Award winners were selected by INSIGHT Into Diversity based on efforts to inspire and encourage a new generation of young people to consider careers in STEM through mentoring, teaching, research, and successful programs and initiatives. 

“We are so thrilled to be recognized for our efforts to diversify the physician workforce in New York State, and reduce disparities in health care,” said Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO of AMSNY. “Our Diversity in Medicine programs would not be possible without the fantastic faculty leading the way at our host medical schools, working to train future doctors from underrepresented backgrounds. Our successful track record is credited to them.”

INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine selected AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine Programs because of their proven track record of success – about 94 percent of students who complete one of AMSNY’s four post-baccalaureate Diversity in Medicine programs go on to medical school. Over the past 25 years, hundreds of doctors from underrepresented backgrounds have successfully completed medical school as a result.

AMSNY’s programs are designed to provide opportunities for high-potential students from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine who do not initially receive an acceptance offer from a medical school. They include a Post-Baccalaureate Program at Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, the Interdisciplinary Basic Medical Sciences Master’s Program at New York Medical College, the Physiology and Biophysics Master’s Program at Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, and the Medical Scholars Master’s Program at SUNY Upstate Medical University.

“We know that many STEM programs are not always recognized for their success, dedication, and mentorship for underrepresented students,” says Lenore Pearlstein, owner and publisher of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine. “We want to honor the schools and organizations that have created programs that inspire and encourage young people who may currently be in or are interested in a future career in STEM. We are proud to honor these programs as role models to other institutions of higher education and beyond.”

A call for nominations for this award was announced in April 2019. 

For more information about the 2019 Inspiring Programs in STEM Award and INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine, visit insightintodiversity.com. 

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About INSIGHT Into Diversity  

INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine is the largest and oldest diversity and inclusion publication in higher education today and is known for its annual INSIGHT Into Diversity Higher Education Excellence in Diversity (HEED) Award, the only award that recognizes colleges and universities for outstanding diversity and inclusion efforts across their campuses. INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine presents timely, thought-provoking news and feature stories on matters of diversity and inclusion in higher education and beyond. Articles include interviews with innovators and experts, as well as explorations of best practices and profiles of exemplary programs. In our Career Center, readers will also discover career opportunities that connect job seekers with institutions and businesses that embrace a diverse and inclusive workforce. Current, archived, and digital issues of INSIGHT Into Diversity magazine are available online at insightintodiversity.com

About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org

New York State Budget Addresses Health Disparities with Funding for Diversity in Medicine Programs, Scholarship

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), on Behalf of Underrepresented in Medicine Students, Thanks the Black, Hispanic, Puerto Rican and Asian Legislative Caucus  

(New York, NY) – On behalf of all 16 medical schools in New York State, and particularly medical students from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine, the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) commends NY State legislators for providing level funding for AMSNY Diversity in Medicine programs in the FY2020 budget.

“AMSNY Diversity in Medicine programs, funded by the NYS Department of Health, have a 94+ percent success rate and have produced hundreds of doctors who often practice in underserved communities and work to reduce health care disparities in our state,” said Jo Wiederhorn, CEO of AMSNY.  “The return on investment for New York is enormous and we are especially grateful to Assembly Majority Leader Crystal Peoples-Stokes, Assembly Member Michael Blake, Assembly Member Marcos Crespo, Senator Jamaal Bailey, Senator Tim Kennedy, Senator Luis Sepulveda, as well as the entire Black, Hispanic, Puerto Rican and Asian Legislative Caucus, and the Hispanic Task Force, for understanding this value and advocating for these programs.”

These state-funded programs are crucial, as a lack of diversity in medicine persists in New York State. Underrepresented minorities (Black/African Americans and Hispanic/Latinos) make up approximately 31% of New York’s population but only 12% of the state’s physician workforce, according to data from the SUNY Albany Center for Health Workforce Studies.

This lack of representation has implications for medical care across the state, as research shows that patients who have doctors from similar racial or ethnic backgrounds have better medical experiences. Additionally, physicians from underrepresented minority groups are more likely to practice primary care and practice in low-income and underserved areas.

AMSNY’s state-funded Diversity in Medicine Program has enabled more than 500 students from ethnic/racial backgrounds which are underrepresented in medicine (and/or from economically or educationally underserved areas) to become doctors. The programs include the 28-year-old, one-year post-baccalaureate program at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, and three post-baccalaureate/master’s programs at New York Medical College, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University School, and SUNY Upstate Medical University.

The new budget also includes funds for diversity in medicine scholarships, which cover the cost of tuition for 1 year for 10 students who graduated from AMSNY post-baccalaureate programs. The cost of medical school tuition is among the biggest barriers to entry for underrepresented in medicine students.

Bronx News 12: Bronx pediatrician works to help under-served immigrant community

Posted: Mar 20, 2019 7:49 AM EDT
Updated: Mar 20, 2019 7:49 AM EDT

 

According to health officials, there are many Spanish-speaking families in the Bronx that have trouble finding a provider that can speak their language.

A Bronx-based caregiver is making it his goal to make sure more Spanish-speaking families can receive the care they need.

“I saw working and training in the Bronx, that there was a big need for Spanish-speaking doctors here,” says Dr. David Aguirre.

Dr. Aguirre works as a pediatrician with the Montefiore Medical Group in the Grand Concourse.

He believes that there is a major miscommunication in patient care when it comes to Spanish-speaking patients that are being treated by English-speaking doctors.

“There are a number of studies that have shown that there are better health care outcomes if a patient can relate to their physician,” says Jo Wiederhorn, president of AMSNY.

Dr. Aguirre says in his experience those studies are proving to be true.

“I can connect with them in terms of the language and also through shared experiences,” says Dr. Aguirre.

According to the Associated Medical Schools of New York, only 6 percent of doctors in New York are Latino.

“It compelled me even more to be able to serve under-served populations,” says Dr. Aguirre. “It helps to be able to understand where they’re coming from and to be able to help them navigate the medical system here in the U.S. Which can be difficult for new patients to this country for the first time.”

Read the article  and watch the interview: http://bronx.news12.com/story/40165267/bronx-pediatrician-works-to-help-underserved-immigrant-community

El Diario: Se necesita más apoyo para que haya más diversidad en la medicina

POR: JAIME NIETO

Se necesita más apoyo para que haya más diversidad en la medicina
El 31% de la población del estado de Nueva York son latinos y afroamericanos, pero solo representamos el 12% de los médicos. FOTO: ARCHIVO / SHUTTERSTOCK

Crecí en Chiquinquirá, Colombia, y cuando era chico, mi héroe era el médico del pueblo; el único médico para más de 40,000 residentes. Hacía todo, desde sacar dientes hasta controlar la presión sanguínea y traer bebés al mundo. Yo quería ser justo como él; ser médico y servir a las personas de mi comunidad.

Pero, mi sueño de convertirme en médico parecía ser una disparatada fantasía infantil.

A pesar de haberme graduado de la secundaria en Bogotá con notas altas, tuve que trabajar en las minas de esmeralda para mantenerme y ayudar a mi familia. 

A los 19, llegué a los Estados Unidos con una visa de estudiante. Sabía muy poco inglés y tuve que tomar trabajos eventuales para poder llegar a la universidad. Y mi sueño aún parecía muy lejano.

Sin embargo, rápidamente me di cuenta de que aquí había muchas oportunidades, especialmente en Nueva York, donde los programas habían sido diseñados para ayudar a un niño como yo a triunfar.

Entonces, me convertí en médico.  De hecho, en cirujano.  Y en el director de Neurocirugía del Hospital Presbyterian Queens de Nueva York.

Lo logré gracias a un programa fundado por el Estado de Nueva York que ayuda a los latinos, personas de color y otros estudiantes de minorías a entrar a las escuelas de medicina. Por más de 25 años, el Estado de Nueva York ha apoyado los programas de diversidad en medicina, puestos en práctica por Escuelas Médicas Asociadas sin Fines de Lucro de Nueva York (AMSNY, por sus siglas en inglés).  Han ayudado a muchas personas como yo a convertirse en médicos.

Y tanto las personas como las comunidades se benefician.  En la actualidad, el 80 por ciento de mis pacientes son latinos.  Muchos hablan poco inglés. Para ellos, es un gran alivio contar con un médico que entienda su cultura. Los estudios muestran que las personas de color tienen muchas más probabilidades de lograr mejores resultados médicos si su médico se ve como ellos y habla su idioma.

Lamentablemente, aún hay muchas personas que no reciben el cuidado que merecen. Y hay muchos estudiantes parecidos a mí que necesitan un poco de apoyo adicional para convertirse en médicos. Las estadísticas lo dicen todo: El 31% de la población del Estado son latinos y afroamericanos, pero solo representamos el 12% de los médicos en el Estado.

Si no hubiese tenido la oportunidad que ofrece AMSNY, hoy no sería médico. Más gente joven necesita la misma oportunidad. 

Nuestros oficiales electos en el Estado están tomando decisiones sobre el presupuesto del próximo año.  Deben asegurarse de incluir más apoyo a la diversidad en los programas de medicina.

-Jaime Nieto es el Jefe de Cirugía Neurológica en el Hospital Presbyterian Queens de Nueva York y ayudante de Cátedra de Clínica Medica de cirugía neurológica en Weill Cornell Medicine.


Read the article online: https://eldiariony.com/2019/03/19/se-necesita-mas-apoyo-para-que-haya-mas-diversidad-en-la-medicina/