News

Crain’s New York: Gov. Hochul should re-establish state’s defunded stem cell science program

November 29, 2021

OP-ED

Gov. Hochul should re-establish state’s defunded stem cell science program

BY JO WIEDERHORN

The pandemic has clearly demonstrated the critical role science and scientists play in solving health threats. Across New York, our scientists quickly redirected existing lines of research to understand SARS-CoV-2, and they partnered with the private sector to launch vaccine trials.

Against that backdrop, it’s troubling that in the spring, the state decided to eliminate its flagship biomedical research program: the New York State Stem Cell Science program. NYSTEM has been an annual investment by the state since 2007, but it was defunded, and all future stem cell research projects were canceled. Moreover, the state withheld funds from researchers who had paused their work early in the pandemic—either because labs were mandated to do so or because they had pivoted to Covid-related work.

I urge Gov. Kathy Hochul to reverse course and re-establish this critical research program.

The power of science

NYSTEM funding has supported innovative research, the discovery of potential new treatments that are in clinical trials, the launch of startup companies and training grants to develop the next generation of scientists.

Research that began with NYSTEM has resulted in approximately $170 million in funding from other governmental and philanthropic sources. The program also has advanced the state’s objective of bringing more venture-capital funding to life sciences companies, with nearly $300 million in VC money supporting businesses that NYSTEM scientists founded.

NYSTEM funding has led to discoveries of potential treatments for critical diseases, including a clinical trial currently underway with leukemia patients at NYU Langone Health and a planned clinical trial for people with advanced Parkinson’s disease to be launched by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center with BlueRock Therapeutics and Weill Cornell Medicine.

Other areas of study include diabetes, Alzheimer’s disease, macular degeneration, cancer and cardiovascular disorders. Without funding, though, projects with years of research behind them have no future in New York.

Researchers pivoted much of their work to focus on treating and understanding Covid-19, like those at Weill Cornell Medicine who used their NYSTEM-funded lab to test about 1,200 drugs for their efficacy in blocking Covid-19 infection.

By eliminating NYSTEM, the state loses all the momentum the program has fostered. Worse yet, researchers—especially young ones—will see the move as a sign that they cannot count on New York to maintain its commitment to support stem cell research or other areas of science, while other states invest in it. (California recently approved an additional $5.5 billion for stem cell research.) Our scientists will look elsewhere to conduct their work, taking with them their intellectual firepower, grant funding and jobs.

If New York is to be a hub for life sciences, and benefit from the medical advances and economic development the sector provides, the state must invest in research.

The power of science has never been clearer. Is New York going to abandon its commitments to its largest research program?

The state must reconsider the impacts and revive NYSTEM as soon as possible.

Jo Wiederhorn is president and CEO of the Associated Medical Schools of New York.

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/op-ed/new-york-stem-cell-science-program-must-be-reestablished (behind paywall)

 

Newsday: Address health disparities with doctor diversity

OPINION/LETTERS

Address health disparities with doctor diversity

The recent research from the Commonwealth Fund shows we must address the dramatic health care disparities faced by Black and Latino New Yorkers [“Disparities in health care,” News, Nov. 18]. One tool we have is increasing diversity among our doctors, as outcomes are improved when patients receive care from doctors from similar racial and ethnic backgrounds.

The article cited disparities among infant mortality rates, and research has shown the mortality rate for Black babies is cut dramatically when Black doctors care for them after birth. But there are too few Black doctors to treat Black patients. Here in New York State, 34% of our population is Black or Hispanic, yet only 13% of our practicing doctors represent those communities.

To increase diversity among doctors, we must address the systemic obstacles to medical school, including financial, academic, and social barriers. Pipeline programs and scholarships for students from underrepresented backgrounds are successful in supporting aspiring doctors to become physicians, and should be expanded to meet our state’s needs.

Jo Wiederhorn, Norwalk, Conn.  

The writer is president and CEO of Associated Medical Schools of New York.

https://www.newsday.com/opinion/letters/newsday-opinion-reader-letters-1.50432761 

Becker’s Hospital Review: 1st year New York med students from underrepresented backgrounds tops 20%, report says

Cailey Gleeson (Twitter)

The number of New York-based first year medical students from underrepresented backgrounds increased to 21.1 percent, the first time the percentage has surpassed 20 percent, according to an annual report from Associated Medical Schools of New York.

The data accounted for the 11,193 students enrolled in New York-based medical schools during the 2020-2021 academic year. 

Of the students from underrepresented backgrounds, 8 percent identified as Black/African American, 7.5 percent identified as Hispanic/Latino, and 7.3 percent identified as 2 or more ethnicities/races. Students who identified as Black/African American, including those who identify as multi ethnic/racial, where one of the races is Black/African American, account for 9.7 percent.

“Twenty percent is worth celebrating, as long as we acknowledge that we have a way to go,” Jo Wiederhorn, president and chief executive officer of AMSNY, said in a press release. “Diversity in medicine is important because we know patients have better health outcomes when they see doctors from their own backgrounds.” 

Read the full report here.

https://www.beckershospitalreview.com/hospital-physician-relationships/1st-year-new-york-med-students-from-underrepresented-backgrounds-tops-20-report-says.html 

BronxNet: BronxTalk with AMSNY’s President and CEO Jo Wiederhorn

November 1, 2021

This week’s BronxTalk features a discussion on Bronx health, COVID infections, vaccination rates, and the importance of training doctors of color to increase patient comfort with expert medical advice. The guests are Dr. Olusimbo Ige, MD, PH, Assistant Commissioner for the Bureau of Health Equity Capacity Building NYC DOHMH; Cyrille Njikeng, Managing Director, Bronx Rising Initiative; Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO, Associate Medical Schools of New York. Hosted by Gary Axelbank.

Watch the video on here on YouTube

Read more about the interview here.

Crain’s New York: State med schools report record-high diversity

 
October 29, 2021 11:31 AM
 
 
Medical school
Unsplash
 

More than 21% of first-year students last year at medical schools in the state were from diverse backgrounds, according to a new report by the Associated Medical Schools of New York.

The consortium, a nonprofit that represents the state’s 17 public and private medical schools, said it was the first time the rate exceeded 20% since it has been tracked.

The statistic captures the share of medical students who come from groups underrepresented in medicine, meaning they identify as American Indian or Alaskan native, Black or African American, Hispanic or Latino, native Hawaiian or Pacific Islander, or a combination.

“Twenty percent is worth celebrating, as long as we acknowledge that we have a way to go,” said Jo Wiederhorn, the consortium’s president and CEO. “Diversity in medicine is important because we know patients have better health outcomes when they see doctors from their own background.”

More than 11,000 students were enrolled at a medical school in the state during the 2020–2021 year, including about 2,600 first-year students. Of those, 8% identify as Black or African American, 7.5% identify as Hispanic or Latino, and 7.3% identify as two or more ethnicities or races, the enrollment report found.

The consortium said many aspiring physicians from marginalized communities face significant hurdles including the thousands of dollars it takes to apply to medical school, a lack of exposure to faculty mentors from similar backgrounds, and imposter syndrome.

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/health-care/new-york-medical-schools-see-record-high-diversity

Report: For First Time, Over 20% of New Medical School Students in New York Come From Backgrounds Underrepresented in Medicine

Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino Students, Including those who Identify as Multi-ethnic/racial, Account for 9.7% and 10.5% of First Year Students

(New York, NY) – The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), a nonprofit organization that represents the 17 medical schools in New York State, has released its Medical School Enrollment Report for 2020-2021 and the number of first year students who are defined as underrepresented in medicine (URIM) increased by almost two points, reaching 21.1 percent. This is the first time since these statistics have been tracked that the percentage has exceeded 20 percent. 

“Twenty percent is worth celebrating, as long as we acknowledge that we have a way to go,” says President and CEO of AMSNY, Jo Wiederhorn. “Diversity in medicine is important because we know patients have better health outcomes when they see doctors from their own backgrounds.” 

Underrepresented in medicine groups make up approximately 31.1% of New York’s population but only 12.1% of the state’s physician workforce. URIM is defined as students who identify as any of these four ethnic/racial categories, either as single or multi-ethnic/racial: American Indian/Alaska Native, Black/African American, Hispanic/Latino, Native Hawaiian/Other Pacific Islander.

According to the AMSNY report, 11,193 students were enrolled in New York State-based medical schools in the 2020-2021 school year. First year students numbered 2,589, of which 21.1 percent identified as URIM. Of those students, 8% identify as Black/ African American, 7.5% identify as Hispanic/Latino represent, and 7.3% identify as 2 or more ethnicities/races. Students who identify as Black/African American, including those who identify as multi ethnic/racial, where one of the races is Black/African American, account for 9.7%. Students who identify as Hispanic/Latino, including those who identify as multi ethnic/racial, where one of the ethnicities is Hispanic/Latino, account for 10.5%.

URIM students face significant barriers in pursuing their dreams to become doctors. Many are first-generation low-income students facing myriad financial, academic and social barriers to entering and completing college. 

“Underrepresented students often do not receive proper guidance and advising at their undergraduate institutions when deciding whether to apply to medical school and they face other barriers to entering the medical field.  Many of those barriers are being addressed through programs, but we need more,” says Dr. Gary Butts, chair of the Committee for Diversity and Multicultural Affairs and associate dean for Diversity Programs at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. 

According to a report, “Addressing the Challenges to a Diverse Physician Workforce,” published by AMSNY in 2020, the application process to get into medical school is another barrier that stops many URIM students. Medical school applicants are recommended to budget $5,000 to $15,000 for the application process alone. Those who are able to apply and are accepted can expect to graduate with $250,000 or more in student loans. Other reasons cited as barriers to URIM students getting into medical school include lack of exposure to similarly underrepresented faculty mentors and feelings of isolation and impostor syndrome.  

“This lack of representation has implications for medical care. Physicians from underrepresented minority groups are more likely to practice primary care and practice in low-income and underserved areas. The COVID-19 pandemic has underscored the dire need to address health disparities. Our programs have over a 30-year track record of doing just that,” said Wiederhorn. “AMSNY Diversity in Medicine programs, funded by the NYS Department of Health, have produced hundreds of doctors who are from underserved communities and who then practice in those same communities.”

Expanding the pipeline of URIM students entering and graduating from medical school is not a simple task and requires a multifaceted approach with significant dedicated resources. Since 1985, AMSNY has supported programs that expand the pool of students choosing careers in medicine and healthcare. 

In 1991, AMSNY launched the highly-successful post-baccalaureate program, which ensures medical school acceptance upon program completion.  The program is funded by New York State. Over 600 post-bacc participants in New York have become doctors. 

In 2017 AMSNY launched a scholarship program funded by the State Legislature. The scholarship covered the cost of tuition for 10 students. This past year, funding from the Cabrini Foundation allowed AMSNY to expand the scholarship program by 10 students. 

***

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 17      public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org

Twice the Number of New York Students Receive Diversity in Medicine Scholarship for Medical School

Students from Underrepresented Backgrounds Awarded Scholarships, Commit to Working in Underserved Areas

(New York)—The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is proud to introduce the 21 recipients of the 2021-2022 AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship. Designed to increase diversity among New York State’s physician workforce, the scholarship is available to medical students from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine who commit to working in an underserved area in NYS upon completion of their education. 

Diversifying the physician workforce is an important part of the effort to reduce health disparities across New York State, which were highlighted by the disproportionate impact of the pandemic. The AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship was launched in 2017 with funding from the New York State Department of Health, thanks to support from the New York State Legislature and the Black, Puerto Rican, Hispanic and Asian Legislative Caucus. The NYS DOH currently supports 11 scholarships. This year, an additional 10 scholarships were funded by the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation

AMSNY has overseen programs to increase the racial and ethnic diversity at medical schools for nearly 30 years.  This year, for the first time, more than 20 percent of first year medical students attending the 17 medical schools based in New York were from underrepresented backgrounds, yet the diversity gap remains large.  Underrepresented minorities (Blacks/African Americans & Hispanics/Latinos) make up approximately 31.1% of New York’s population but only 12.1% of the state’s physician workforce.

“AMSNY congratulates this year’s Diversity in Medicine Scholarship recipients, each of whom is passionate about medicine and improving health disparities in underserved communities,” said Jo Wiederhorn, CEO of AMSNY.  “Through this program, we’re able to reduce barriers to a medical education for students from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine, helping to diversify New York’s physician workforce and reduce health disparities.”

The scholarship helps to address the financial barriers that medical students from underrepresented backgrounds face. To be eligible for the scholarship, students must have completed one of AMSNY four post-baccalaureate programs, which are designed to create opportunities for students who have experienced barriers to a medical education including financial, academic and social barriers.

INTRODUCING THE 2021-2022 AMSNY SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS 

THIRD-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

  • DEASHIA MCALPINE, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’23 
  • MICHEAL OLUWAFEMI OLU-TALABI, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University,
    MD, ’22
  • SAMANTHA WILLIAMS, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’23 
  • EMELIO WOODSTOCK, Medical School: Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, MD, ’22 

SECOND-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

  • OBIOESIO BASSEY, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, MD, ’22 

FIRST-TIME SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS

  • DOMINIQUE ALEXIS, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’25
  • ALEJANDRO ANDRADE, New York Medical College, MD, ’22
  • JESSE KWAME ASIEDU, State University of New York, Downstate Health Sciences University,
    MD, ’25
  • COLLEEN BECKFORD, State University of New York, Downstate Health Sciences University, MD, ’23
  • HILARY BRIGHT, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, MD, ’23 
  • DEVANTE BRYANT-NURSE, Albany Medical College, MD, ’25
  • VANESSA CHICAS, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’25
  • DANYA CONTRERAS, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’25
  • JOSE DELIZ, State University of New York, Downstate Health Sciences University, MD, ’25
  • JERLIN GARO, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, MD, ’25
  • ROMARIO GIBSON, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’24
  • KATHERINE GUZMAN, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’25
  • NNEKA ONWUMERE, State University of New York, Upstate Medical University, MD, ’24
  • LUNA PAREDES, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, MD, ’25
  • ROBERT SIMMONS, Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University, MD, ’24
  • SAVANNAH STEWART, Albany Medical College, MD, ’25

About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org.

 

Spectrum NY1: This group is addressing a lack of diversity in medicine

Over the past year, the COVID-19 pandemic has highlighted a lack of diversity among physicians in medicine, but the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is working to change that.  

The AMSNY is creating pathways for people who are underrepresented to become doctors. This July, a graduate of their program, Akya Myrie, is set to start her residency in urology at the Cleveland Clinic, after graduating from SUNY Downstate College of Medicine.

Myrie grew up in Brooklyn, after her mother immigrated to the United States from Jamaica.

In an interview with NY1’s Ruschell Boone, Myrie said that in her heritage, becoming a doctor is a profession that comes with great pride. Her reason to become a doctor specifically was her brother is mentally disabled and had a lack of access to care in Jamaica. After watching him navigate his health care in the United States, it was a natural decision for her to become a doctor and help those in need who were similar to her brother.

Myrie specifically decided to pursue urology after a health trip to Jamaica where she noticed the disparity in prostate care in the country and the high rates of prostate cancer. She realized how much work there is to be done in that field after returning to Brooklyn.

While applying to SUNY Downstate for medical, Myrie learned about the AMSNY program. She was offered a position in the AMSNY post-baccalaureate program, which she continued into the following summer after medical school.

One of the goals of the AMSNY program is to create diversity in the medical workforce. President and CEO of AMSNY, Jo Wiederhorn, explained that the pandemic showed that Black Americans do not always feel comfortable receiving care since there are fewer doctors that are Black in the United States. If Black Americans had doctors that they were able to relate to, they would feel more comfortable receiving and accessing medical care. According to a study from Stanford University, the outcomes for Black men who were treated by Black physicians were much better than the outcomes of Black men who were not treated by bBack doctors.

When asked how it feels to be called, “doctor,” Myrie said, “It feels so surreal, knowing how far I have come, it’s such an honor and privilege to hold the title of doctor.”

https://www.ny1.com/nyc/all-boroughs/health/2021/06/29/this-group-is-addressing-lack-of-diversity-in-medicine# 

Caribbean Life: Jamaican American student defies odds, becomes medical doctor


Jamaican-American Dr. Akya Myrie.
AMSNY/Akya Myrie

Akya Myrie grew up in Canarsie, Brooklyn after her mother migrated to the United States in the 1980s from Jamaica and witnessed her family’s search for better medical services for her older brother, who is described as “profoundly mentally disabled.”

While growing up in Brooklyn, Myrie, 26, learned that, though medical care was better in the US, her, single parent, mother and brother still struggled to access quality medicine and culturally-competent care.

This inequity, while leading Myrie to pursue a career in medicine, instilled in her a drive to serve vulnerable communities and individuals who are chronically underserved.

Myrie graduated, in 2012, from Leon M. Goldstein High School for the Sciences on the campus of Kingsborough Community College in Brighton Beach, Brooklyn.

She then attended college at Stony Brook University, graduating in 2016 with a bachelor’s degree in health science.

Afterwards, Myrie completed a state-funded Diversity in Medicine program at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences at the University of Buffalo, run by the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY).

Myrie said the program — which guarantees medical school admission on graduation and requires recipients to return to New York to practice medicine in an underserved community – prepared her academically and emotionally for medical school, and to become a doctor.

After completing the post-baccalaureate program at the University of Buffalo, Myrie enrolled at the State University of New York, Downstate Medical Center’s College of Medicine, where she was inducted into the Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society, the highest achievement in medical school.

In medical school, Dr. Myrie said she was very fortunate to receive AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine scholarship four times; and that she started various community service initiatives, participated in several research projects on health disparities in transplantation, kidney disease, prostate cancer and bladder cancer, and joined a team to aid in a medical mission to Jamaica.

Next month, Dr. Myrie said she will begin her residency, for six years, in urology at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio.

She also said she is excited to return home after completing her residency to work with an underserved community as a urologist, describing her commitment to serve as an honor, rather than a requirement.

“Growing up in Brooklyn, as the daughter of Jamaican immigrants, I saw people who looked like me suffer from higher rates of asthma, diabetes and other chronic illnesses more than their white counterparts,” Dr. Myrie told Caribbean Life in an interview.

“New Yorkers have always had a gap in health and healthcare, based on race and ethnicity; and, in the past year, I’ve seen COVID-19 widened those gaps,” she added. “People of color, like me, have experienced the highest death rates from this pandemic. That is why I feel a sense of urgency to start helping patients.

“Once I complete my residency, I plan to return to my Brooklyn community to serve those who, I believe, count on people like me — people who look like them, sound like them, understand their culture and community,” Dr. Myrie continued. “It is the kind of care that my brother, who has profound developmental disabilities, received.

“With his care, I saw firsthand the impact and importance of diversity in medicine,” she said.

But, despite earning her bachelor of science degree at Stony Brook University and dreaming of becoming a doctor, Myrie said she faced adversity.

“As the child of an immigrant, the cost of medical school seemed like an insurmountable challenge, and I didn’t feel quite prepared to enter medical school,” she said.

However, she said the rigorous state-funded Diversity in Medicine program helped her prepare academically and emotionally for medical school.

“And receiving AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine scholarship four years in a row helped me focus on being the best medical professional possible without the burden of medical school debt,” said Dr. Myrie, giving high praise to her family and others for her remarkable success.

“During my time studying, my family, especially my mother, was my support system,” she added. “I also believe that, without the support of the Associated Medical Schools of New York, my professors, faculty and staff at Stony Brook, the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biological Sciences at the University of Buffalo, and Downstate College of Medicine, I would not be where I am today.”

Dr. Myrie’s proud mother, who asked that her name not be used, told Caribbean Life on Wednesday: “Firsthand experiencing the need for quality healthcare with my autistic, mentally challenged son, I am so overjoyed and enthusiastic that my beloved, beautiful and brilliant daughter, who was tremendously inspired by her brother, is now a medical doctor.

“She now will be able to contribute immensely to medicine, especially to the underserved community,” Dr. Myrie’s mother said. “She is the physician our family needed throughout our search for adequate medical service.”

https://caribbeanlifenews/jamaican-american-student-defies-odds-becomes-medical-doctor

 

CRAIN’S NEW YORK BUSINESS: In blow to health care’s innovation economy, state cancels funding for stem cell research

MAYA KAUFMAN  

May 5, 2021

The state is planning to dissolve a program funding stem cell research, a move that scientists warn will deal a blow to New York’s health and science startup economy.

Lawmakers eliminated the New York State Stem Cell Science program, or NYSTEM, as part of the budget approved last month. The budget bill halts new NYSTEM funding and schedules the program to terminate in 2025, once existing contracts expire.

NYSTEM launched in 2007 and has since devoted an estimated $490 million in funding to stem cell research. Last year the program opened applications for an additional $50 million in grants—enough for about 70 awards—but never gave out the money, researchers said.

Researchers often use stem cells, which have the power to develop into almost any kind of cell in the body, to better understand diseases and how to treat them. Findings can lead to the creation of drugs or other health care innovations.

NYSTEM-funded research has spawned multiple startups, including BlueRock Therapeutics, which formed in 2016 to expand on stem cell research by Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center. Pharmaceutical company Bayer bought the company for $600 million in 2019, in a deal that valued BlueRock at about $1 billion.

Researchers working on NYSTEM-funded projects have also used their grants to pivot to studying Covid-19 during the pandemic.

Weill Cornell Medicine researcher Todd Evans, who was using stem cells to study heart disease, has since pivoted to examining Covid-19’s effect on the heart. He is also using stem cells to test whether drugs already approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration can be used to combat Covid-19.

“Without NYSTEM, this work would not have gotten done,” said Jonathan Teyan, chief operating officer at the Associated Medical Schools of New York, a consortium of the state’s 17 public and private medical schools.

The state Department of Health declined to answer questions about the decision to eliminate NYSTEM, instead referring them to the state budget office.

“The expectation is that this research continues to advance within academic and private research communities rather than the Department of Health, which is focused on its core mission of delivering direct services and achieving positive health outcomes for all New Yorkers,” Freeman Klopott, a spokesman for the state Division of the Budget, said in a statement.

But Evans and Teyan said NYSTEM often funded experimental research that other institutions, like the National Institutes of Health, rarely do. Both said the program’s elimination leaves a funding gap that federal grants or philanthropy may not fill, especially given how expensive stem cell research can be.

“NYSTEM allowed us to be pretty creative,” Evans said.

The state appears to have instead shifted its focus to the life sciences, which often entails commercializing scientific research. Gov. Andrew Cuomo announced a $650 million life sciences initiative in 2016. More recently, a Partnership Fund for New York City report named the life science industry as key to the city’s economic recovery.

Teyan said New York would be better off following in the footsteps of states like California and Massachusetts, which have found success investing in the entire research pipeline, from the basics to the later stages, aimed at turning those findings into new companies and drugs. “This really should be part of the conversation about building back our economy,” he said.

https://www.crainsnewyork.com/health-care/blow-health-cares-innovation-economy-state-cancels-funding-stem-cell-research