News

More Students than Ever Receive AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is proud to introduce the 33 recipients of the 2023-2024 AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship. Thanks to a $1 million investment from the New York State Legislature, more students than ever before are receiving much-needed scholarship support.

Designed to increase the diversity of the New York State physician workforce, the scholarship is available to medical students who have faced adversity and overcome obstacles on the path to medical school. The Scholarship addresses one of the greatest barriers to medical school – the high cost of tuition – and is part of a continuum of programs AMSNY funds and oversees to expand diversity in medicine.

The scholarship is indexed to the cost of SUNY medical school tuition and is awarded for a minimum of two years and a maximum of four years.  To be eligible for the scholarship, students must have completed one of AMSNY four post-baccalaureate programs, which create opportunities for students who have experienced barriers to a medical education including financial, academic and social barriers. The post-baccalaureate programs are highly successful, with 93 percent of graduates enrolling in medical school in New York.

AMSNY has overseen programs to increase diversity at medical schools for nearly 40 years.  Due to this longstanding commitment by AMSNY and our medical schools and New York State’s support,  New York is a leader in the nation in providing pathways for students who have faced adversity and diversifying the medical student population and the physician workforce.

The AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship is also supported by the New York State Department of Health and the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation.

 

AMSNY Statement on United States Supreme Court Decisions in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), the consortium of the 17 medical schools of New York State, is profoundly concerned that the United State Supreme Court decisions in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and Students for Fair Admissions v. University of North Carolina will diminish opportunities for talented students pursuing careers in medicine and science. These decisions reject a longstanding precedent that recognized the compelling interest of ensuring diversity in higher education and may undermine recent advances to address inequities in medical education and research.

In 2022, AMSNY joined the Association of American Medical Colleges and 44 other groups in filing an amicus curiae brief in these cases. We urged the Court to continue allowing schools to include race and ethnicity as a limited consideration when reviewing medical school applicants. AMSNY is dedicated to ensuring that the physician and scientific workforce is broadly representative of our communities by providing opportunities for people from groups underrepresented in medicine and science to attend and thrive in medical and graduate school. 

Through the AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Program and Diversity in Medicine Scholarship, and decades of intentional work by our medical schools, New York State has become a leader in the effort to create a healthcare workforce that more closely matches the racial and ethnic backgrounds of the people it serves. In 2020, New York’s medical schools achieved an important milestone, with more than 20% of matriculating medical students identifying with groups underrepresented in medicine. Still, more work needs to be done, as nearly one-third of New Yorkers are Black/African American and Hispanic/Latino. As numerous studies make clear, health outcomes improve markedly when there is racial/ethnic and cultural concordance between patient and provider.

While the Supreme Court’s decision will necessitate reevaluation of admissions processes, AMSNY remains strongly committed to providing educational opportunities and support for those underrepresented in medicine and science. We will work in partnership with our member institutions to ensure that our physicians and scientists reflect the communities they serve. 

AMSNY Statement: FY2024 New York State Budget Boosts Diversity in Medicine Programs

$4.64M Investment Will Further Efforts to Close Physician Diversity Gap and Reduce Health Care Disparities

Jonathan Teyan, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Associated Medical Schools of New York, which represents all 17 medical schools in the state, issued the following statement in response to the New York State FY24 Budget:

“Governor Hochul and the New York State Legislature have again demonstrated their strong commitment to addressing healthcare disparities in New York by investing in a diverse physician workforce. The Governor’s $3.644M investment in AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine programs will support more than 800 students from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in medicine on their paths to becoming doctors. The Legislature’s $1 million investment in AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine Scholarship will continue to reduce financial barriers for medical students and ensure a pipeline of physicians who will practice in underserved communities in New York State.

“The State-supported Diversity in Medicine programs have made a tangible difference in diversifying the pipeline of future doctors. More than 20 percent of first-year medical students in New York are from groups underrepresented in medicine (compared to about 13 percent nationally). This is the result of decades of investments from our medical schools and commitment by New York State. With Governor Hochul and the Legislature’s support, we will continue to make significant strides towards a physician workforce that represents all New Yorkers, which is an essential component of reducing healthcare disparities.

On behalf of the New York medical school community, we thank Governor Hochul, her administration, and the NYS Assembly and Senate for their investment in improving the future of healthcare in New York.”

 About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is the consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools in New York State. AMSNY works in partnership with its members to advance biomedical research, diversity in medical schools and the physician workforce, and high quality and cost-efficient care. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $35 billion. AMSNY member schools include: 

  • Albany Medical College
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • CUNY School of Medicine
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • New York Medical College
  • Norton College of Medicine at Upstate Medical University
  • NYU Langone Health
    ○ NYU Grossman School of Medicine
    ○ NYU Long Island School of Medicine
  • Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University
  • SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University
  • Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
  • Weill Cornell Medicine
  • Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org

Rochester Democrat and Chronicle Op-ed: Support funding to attract medical talent

Your Turn

Harry Bronson and Jeremy Cooney Guest columnists

New York-based medical schools are up against schools in states like Massachusetts, California, and Texas, that invest billions to recruit away the most talented researchers.

With the state budget still under negotiation, we often talk about spending and return on investment. Surprisingly, many programs the state funds actually generate more money for the state.

One of those programs is NYFIRST, a program that supports the recruitment and retention of world-class scientific talent at our 17 medical schools. In the first three grant cycles of the program, every dollar invested by the state saw a $3.72 return. The total $9 million state investment has resulted in the creation of over 180 jobs with an average salary of about $75,000. That’s an investment of which we should be proud.

Funding for the program is running out. The state should make a commitment in the upcoming budget to continue to support NYFIRST – and expand the funding.

The University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, located in my district, was awarded two NYFIRST grants. In both instances, the school was able to recruit researchers who are at the top of their field and making advances in medicine that are critical to improving and prolonging the lives of New Yorkers – and all people.

Paula Vertino was working at Emory University when Rochester was able to recruit her to continue her research on cancer epigenetics, which is used to understand how cancer cells react to their environments and discover ways to control those reactions.

The CDC projects a 49% increase in cancer rates, so more breakthroughs can’t come soon enough.

Rochester was also able to recruit Steven Silverstein to be the director of the newly established Rochester Center for Brain and Retina. Rochester anticipates that the research led by Silverstein will increase the number of copyright and trademark registrations and patentable discoveries by approximately five each year and create 41 new jobs.

Other medical schools who have been awarded grants include SUNY Upstate, Columbia, and Mount Sinai. Funding from the program, which was designed by Empire State Development with input from the Associated Medical Schools of New York, is used to upgrade lab spaces, purchase equipment and hire support staff.

Like most industries, the medical research field is seeing stiff competition for talent recruitment, and New York-based medical schools are up against schools in states like Massachusetts, California, and Texas, that invest billions to recruit away the most talented researchers. NYFIRST, by comparison, is small, but has been highly effective.

The Legislature has supported this program from its inception and this year the Assembly has committed a new $20 million to the program. Let’s keep it going and keep recruiting great talent to Rochester and other New York communities.

Harry Bronson is a state Assembly member and chair of the Assembly Committee on Economic Development, Job Creation, Commerce and Industry. Jeremy Cooney is a state senator and chair of the Senate Committee on Procurement and Contracts.

Read the op-ed here: RochesterDemocratandChronicle Op Ed

 

BronxTimes Op-Ed: Thanks to New York State, I’m close to being a doctor who provides care in my native language

 
 
Serious doctors examine patient’s test results
Last year, Gov. Kathy Hochul invested $2.444 million in AMSNY’s range of Diversity in Medicine programs, and this year the governor has proposed an additional $1.2 million investment in the program. This means AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine programs can support more than 800 students from underrepresented backgrounds as they pursue medical degrees.
Photo courtesy Getty Images
 

When I immigrated with my family to New York City from the Dominican Republic at age 18 I couldn’t speak English, but I knew I wanted to be a doctor. I soon experienced firsthand how people like my family and me, despite being part of a large community, often were not understood by our physicians. That strengthened my resolve. I had a lifelong love of science and knew I could be a doctor who provides care in our native language — the kind of care I wanted my family to have.

Fourteen years later, I’m so close to achieving that goal, thanks to a lot of hard work and some well-timed support from New York state.

My journey to medical school started with redoing high school from ages 18-22. I then attended a private university, but had to leave shortly after due to finances, and I transferred to Hunter College. Though I had to take a gap year while navigating some challenges, I ultimately graduated. I got a full-time job as a research assistant at a research institution, where our team conducted multiple scientific studies and published results, never forgetting my goal of going to medical school. Unfortunately, I soon found the MCAT and application process was incredibly difficult to navigate, especially while working. A 2017 study of minority students and medical school admissions cited the application process as the most challenging part, calling it “overwhelming, difficult and expensive” — and that was absolutely true for me. Despite applying all over the country, it was New York state’s medical schools that understood my passion and potential.

I was invited to join the Associated Medical Schools of New York’s (AMSNY) Diversity in Medicine Post-Baccalaureate Program at the Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. The year-long program is designed to provide Black, Latino and Native American students — backgrounds that are significantly underrepresented in medicine — an opportunity to become doctors. If participants successfully complete the program, they are guaranteed acceptance to a New York state medical school. It was the perfect program.

AMSNY said “We believe in you.” The organization supported my education with a year of tuition for classes, plus a stipend for living expenses and books, so that I had the opportunity to be successful. I was brought into a community with people who, like me, have struggled to reach this point. It was incredibly powerful and extremely motivating to be in an academic environment surrounded by people who look like me. The coursework was designed to prepare us for the rigors of medical school, and my grades improved because I finally had the privilege of being a full-time student, without worrying about basic things like food and housing.

Last year, Gov. Kathy Hochul invested $2.444 million in AMSNY’s range of Diversity in Medicine programs, and this year the governor has proposed an additional $1.2 million investment in the program. This means AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine programs can support more than 800 students from underrepresented backgrounds as they pursue medical degrees. I am proud that New York state is working to diversify its physician workforce to match our diverse population, especially since research shows that it makes a real impact in addressing health disparities. While my medical school training emphasizes training future physicians to care for diverse patients, some patients benefit from receiving care from clinicians with similar backgrounds. For example, a 2018 Stanford University study found that Black men are more likely to agree to preventative health services if they see a Black doctor.

AMSNY and New York state also support students like me through a scholarship that is funded annually by the state Legislature, in combination with a grant from the Mother Cabrini Health Foundation. The Diversity in Medicine scholarship provides $42,000 a year in medical school tuition to 30 students who have gone through AMSNY’s programs. I am proud to be a recipient of this scholarship, which helps address the significant disparities in educational debt between Black, Hispanic/Latino and Native American students in comparison to our counterparts. I urge the Legislature to continue supporting this scholarship, which requires a commitment to practice medicine in an underserved area of New York.

I am now entering my third year as a medical student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx, about to begin my clinical rotations. I’m incredibly excited that after more than a decade of education I will start interacting with and supporting patients, especially Spanish-speaking patients. They are the reason that I dedicated so many years to get where I am today, and why I will continue to work to provide the best medical care I can.

Luna Maria Paredes is a student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Class of 2025, and a recipient of the Associated Medical Schools of New York’s Diversity in Medicine Scholarship.

https://www.bxtimes.com/letter-doctor-native-language/ 


Spectrum News Albany: Scholarship program aims to diversify health care work force

 
 
 

Scholarship program aims to diversify health care work force

The pandemic showcased the sacrifices made by front-line health care workers who worked tirelessly to keep New Yorkers healthy. But it also revealed a severe shortage of professionals in hospitals and clinics, and shined a light on the underrepresentation of minority groups in the health sector.

The Associated Medical Schools of New York is trying to address the diversity issue.

Savannah Stewart’s mother emigrated from Liberia. Her father was an African American living in Alabama and together, their struggle to fit in and feel represented became an inspiration for Stewart to break barriers and confront systemic racism.

“Working as a nurse, there were times where patients didn’t trust her patients, family members didn’t want to speak to her and they thought that she was a member of the staff or didn’t have the position that she held because of what she looked like,” said Stewart.

 


What You Need To Know

    • According to the Associated Medical Schools of New York, underrepresented minorities, such as Black and Hispanic communities, make up 31% of New York’s population
    • New York’s workforce only has 12% of Black and Hispanic population represented
    • Health disparities within Black and Hispanic communities have been exacerbated since the COVID-19 pandemic

A medical student, Stewart said it’s extremely important for minorities to see themselves represented in health care. To have someone who understands how background and culture plays into their illnesses and its outcomes is vital.

But the road to that representation is not without challenges.

“When you’re a student of color, there’s always a worry that people won’t think that you’re qualified to do what you want to do, no matter how much you’ve been studying, how much effort you’ve put in,” Stewart said. “And there’s always that fear that someone won’t want to work with you.”

To close the gap, the Associated Medical Schools of New York has an annual scholarship program which gives 30 students of color from educationally and/or economically underserved backgrounds an option they would not otherwise have.

Stewart is one of its recipients.

“This scholarship helped me so much along the way. First, from being in my (post-baccalaurate) program where I was allowed to take more courses and for the first time in my life, I was not working two jobs and also trying to fulfill science requirements,” said Stewart.

This scholarship awards $42,000 per year for a maximum of four years and a minimum of two years. Upon finishing medical school, the students will work in an underserved area in the state.

To be eligible, the students must have completed one of the five post-baccalaureate programs of the Associated Medical Schools of New York. You can find more information on their website amsny.org.

AMSNY: Hochul’s Budget Gives Another Boost to Diversity In Medicine

$3.644M Proposed Investment Ensures NY Will Do More to Close the Physician Diversity Gap and Improve Patient Health Outcomes
 
Jonathan Teyan, President and Chief Executive Officer of the Associated Medical Schools of New York, which represents all 17 medical schools in the state, issued the following statement in response to Governor Hochul’s proposed FY24 Budget:
 
“Governor Hochul has shown us once again her administration’s commitment to supporting physician diversity in New York. Her proposed $3.644M investment in AMSNY’s Diversity in Medicine programs will support more than 800 students from backgrounds traditionally underrepresented in medicine in pursuing medical degrees.
 
“These State-funded programs have had a huge impact. For the first time in history, more than 20 percent of first year medical students in New York are from backgrounds underrepresented in medicine. We have no doubt that the State’s investments over the past 25+ years have been transformative. With Governor Hochul doubling down on the State’s investment last year (from $1.244M in FY22 to $2.44M in FY23), and next year’s proposed increase, we are certain we will continue to make significant strides towards a physician workforce that represents all New Yorkers, which is key to improving health outcomes.”
 
Learn more about AMSNY diversity programs here.
 
In addition to working to diversify the state’s physician workforce, and contributing to medical research and discoveries, the states 17 medical schools also represent a large economic engine for the state, contributing $35B to the state’s economy, according to a new economic impact report. Read more here.

WNYC’s The Capitol Pressroom: New York’s medical school urge state investment in research

Medical schools across New York are pushing for a $25 million investment from the state budget in growing the Empire State’s medical academic research capacity. Associated Medical Schools of New York President & CEO Jonathan Teyan explains the potential economic development benefit from this commitment.

Listen to the interview here:  https://capitolpressroom.org/2023/02/09/new-yorks-medical-school-urge-state-investment-in-research/.

Associated Medical Schools of New York Names Jonathan Teyan New President & CEO

– The organization, representing the 17 medical schools across the state, thanks Jo Wiederhorn for 20 years of leadership  – 

(New York, NY) – The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) announces that Jonathan Teyan has assumed the role of President & CEO as of January 1, 2023. AMSNY represents the 17 public and private medical schools across New York State, acting as the voice of medical education. Jonathan succeeds Jo Wiederhorn, who held this role from 2002 through 2022. While stepping down, Jo will remain involved with AMSNY, focusing on the organization’s diversity in medicine initiatives.

Jonathan joined AMSNY in 2011 and has served as Chief Operating Officer since 2013. In this role he led the organization’s successful efforts advocating for biomedical research funding and promoting the importance of medical education to the state’s healthcare and economy. Jonathan also holds the title of President of New York State Academic Dental Centers (NYSADC), the consortium of New York’s six dental schools. 

Jonathan began his career in science studying conservation biology at Cornell University, then at the National Audubon Society, where he directed that organization’s largest environmental education center. He has an MPA in Management from Columbia University’s School of International and Public Affairs, where he began a longstanding interest in health care policy, subsequently joining AMDec Foundation in 2005, where he worked on large-scale collaborative biomedical research initiatives. 

“I’m proud to step into this new role at the Associated Medical Schools of New York, supporting the organization and mission that I have been dedicated to for the last decade-plus,” said Jonathan Teyan, new President and CEO of AMSNY. “In this new chapter, we will continue to build on our work diversifying the physician and scientific workforce and advancing biomedical research in New York State.”

“We are thrilled that Jonathan Teyan will assume leadership of AMSNY, as he is uniquely prepared, has been integral to the organization’s success over the past decade, and has the right vision to move us forward in years to come” said Mark Taubman, Chair of AMSNY’s Board of Trustees and Dean of the University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry. “We are also immensely grateful to Jo Wiederhorn for her 20 years of leadership, filled with many invaluable contributions to the medical education community.”

Jo Wiederhorn was the President and CEO of the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) since 2002. During her tenure the organization saw tremendous success  in advancing its priorities. AMSNY advocated for state investment in biomedical research and saw millions of dollars allocated to scientists at academic medical centers through the NYSTEM program (2007-2021) and NYFIRST program (ongoing). She oversaw the expansion of efforts to diversify the physician workforce through post-baccalaureate programs for aspiring medical students, including a historic investment from the state last year, doubling resources for the program. Jo was responsible for launching the AMSNY Diversity in Medicine Scholarship, funded by the New York State Legislature and Cabrini Health Foundation. The scholarship started with 10 students in 2017 and now each year provides 30 medical students from underrepresented backgrounds with $42,000 towards tuition and fees. Jo will remain involved in the organization, working to advance diversity in medicine initiatives.

“I am incredibly proud of the accomplishments the AMSNY team has been able to achieve over the past decade in advocating for more diversity in medicine and investment in biomedical research,” said Jo Wiederhorn, former President & CEO. “While stepping out of this role is bittersweet, I know AMSNY will enjoy continued successes under Jonathan’s leadership, to the benefit of the whole medical education community.”

Under Jonathan’s leadership, the organization will continue working to diversify New York State’s physician workforce, advocating for biomedical research, and highlighting the role of academic medical centers.

About AMSNY

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is the consortium of the 17 public and private medical schools in New York State. AMSNY works in partnership with its members to advance biomedical research, diversity in medical schools and the physician workforce, and high quality and cost-efficient care. The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $35 billion. AMSNY member schools include:

  • Albany Medical College
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine
  • Columbia University Vagelos College of Physicians and Surgeons
  • CUNY School of Medicine
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
  • Jacobs School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences, University at Buffalo, SUNY
  • New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • New York Medical College
  • Norton College of Medicine at Upstate Medical University
  • NYU Grossman School of Medicine
  • NYU Long Island School of Medicine
  • Renaissance School of Medicine at Stony Brook University
  • SUNY Downstate Health Sciences University
  • Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine
  • University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry
  • Weill Cornell Medicine
  • Zucker School of Medicine at Hofstra/Northwell

For more information on AMSNY, please visit: www.amsny.org