News

AMSNY’s Science and Technology Entry Program “STEPs” Out in New York

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

On October 23, 2010, the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), in conjunction with the Science Technology Entry Program (STEP) and the Collegiate Science and Technology Entry Program (CSTEP) Bronx/ Manhattan region, Center for Multicultural and Community Affairs at the Mount Sinai School of Medicine and the Northeast Regional Alliance Health Careers Opportunity Program will host a college fair for high school students enrolled in the AMSNY STEP program.

Who:
AMSNY, Bronx/Manhattan STEP/CSTEP Region

What:
College Fair for STEP Students

When:
Saturday, October 23, 2010
9 a.m. – 1 p.m.

Where:
City College of New York
The Great Hall in Shepard Hall
140th Street and Convent Avenue
New York, NY

The fair will provide students interested in entering the fields of science, technology, medical or health professions with the opportunity to meet with CSTEP representatives from New York State colleges and universities, attend workshops on the application process, and receive detailed financial aid information. In addition, the fair will offer admissions and financial aid workshops to parents of potential college applicants.

“STEP was crafted in mid-1980’s with two goals in mind: to motivate and increase interest in medicine, science, and the health-related professions for students in grades 7 through 12 who are educationally and economically disadvantaged and underrepresented in the scientific, technical and health-related professions, and to help increase diversity in medicine – an acute need in light of the shortage and maldistribution of physicians nationally and in New York State.” said AMSNY President and Chief Executive Officer Jo Wiederhorn.

“In fact the federal Council on Graduate Medical Education forecasted a substantial shortage of physicians – between 85,000 and 96,000 – by 2020. Program’s like STEP will help alleviate this shortage,” Ms. Wiederhorn added.

AMSNY’s STEP consortium model is the only statewide program of its kind. It is conducted at 10 of the 16 medical schools in New York State, including: Albany Medical College, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York College of Osteopathic Medicine, New York Medical College, New York University School of Medicine, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry, SUNY Downstate Medical Center, and SUNY Buffalo School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

According to Ms. Wiederhorn, each of the 10 schools have developed their own unique STEP program. The institutions provide intensive summer courses as well as afternoon or weekend classes during the school year. They all include a variety of the following components:

  • Exposure to the medical school environment and curriculum
  • Career presentations from various health-profession fields Internships
  • Participation in clinical and laboratory field experiences
  • College counseling
  • Personal counseling
  • Academic/study skills, including Regent’s and SAT review
  • Oral and written research projects
  • Building self-esteem
  • Values and ethics exploration
  • Multicultural development
  • Social awareness development
  • Field trips
  • Parents Advisory Council (PAC)
  • Commemoration: awards, scholarship & other successes

In addition, all of the programs provide classes that are specifically designed for high school students. Most are taught by medical school students or faculty; others are taught by faculty of the parent institution. Courses include:

  • Cell physiology/histology
  • Neuroscience
  • Molecular biology
  • Genetics
  • Cardiology
  • Organic Chemistry
  • Pre-calculus/calculus
  • Behavioral sciences
  • Infectious disease
  • English composition

“STEP is a highly successful program; it inspires students who were not sure college was in their future to pursue a career in the medical field. And, it has helped increase diversity in medicine,” Ms. Wiederhorn said.

In 2009-10, approximately 442 students from 175 high schools throughout New York were enrolled in STEP. Of those 442 students, 53 percent were African-American and 34 percent were Hispanic/Latino. Students conducted more than 16,464 hours of research and internship experience.

Additionally in 2010:

  • 110 students plan to attend college – 74 percent in a STEP-related field
  • 97 percent of the students had a grade point average over 80; and
  • 100 percent of the students received Advanced Placement (AP) credits, if enrolled in an AP course.

AMSNY Post-Baccalaureate Program Continues Success in its 20th Year

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY), a consortium of the 16 private and public medical schools in New York State, recently welcomed the 20th cohort of students into the AMSNY Post-Baccalaureate Program at University at Buffalo, SUNY School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences.

“New York State has long been a leader in producing the nation’s medical students, many of whom return to the community to deliver quality health care,” said AMSNY President and Chief Executive Officer Jo Wiederhorn. “While underrepresented minorities make up 32.9 percent of the New York State population, they account for only 9.5 percent of New York physicians. However, in the past 20 years the AMSNY/University at Buffalo Post-Baccalaureate Program has been extremely successful in attempting to address these concerns and preparing students for medical school by offering them free tuition at the University at Buffalo, a stipend to cover living and personal expenses and conditional acceptance into medical school.”

“Following successful completion of the program and its requirements, the students are guaranteed admission to medical school the following year,” said Ms. Wiederhorn. Launching at the start of the 1990-1991 academic year as a means to increase the diversity in medical school, the post-baccalaureate program offers students a unique 12-month inter-disciplinary curriculum in preparation for medical school. The year-long program, housed at the University at Buffalo, is open to students who are underrepresented in medicine, educationally, or economically disadvantaged and have not been accepted to a medical school. Qualifying students are referred to the program through the admissions process at one of AMSNY’s participating medical schools.

While at the University at Buffalo, students receive interdisciplinary coursework in math and science tailored to each student’s needs; in addition to formal mentoring, advising and tutoring to ensure their ultimate success. Students must receive a B or higher in all courses and must obtain a predetermined Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score in order to move onto medical school. University at Buffalo covers the students’ tuition and AMSNY provides students with stipends, allowing them to concentrate solely on their academics. Students are not permitted to work while in the program.

According to Ms. Wiederhorn, 92 percent of students in the post-baccalaureate program matriculate to medical school. Eighty-five percent of these students graduate from medical school. “The majority of these graduates continue into primary care residencies in New York State,” she said.

The continued success of the AMSNY post-baccalaureate program led to an increase in state funding and the opportunity to expand the program model. In 2008, AMSNY created a masters degree post-baccalaureate program, which is currently housed at three schools in New York State: SUNY Upstate Medical University, New York Medical College, and Stony Brook University Medical Center. Like the Buffalo program, the masters degree post-baccalaureate program programs serve the same student demographic. Qualifying students are referred to a masters program through the admissions process at participating medical schools. Upon successful completion of the masters program, the students are guaranteed admission to the referring medical school the following year.

The State Budget, passed on June 7, included an appropriation of $1.7 million for program services and expenses.

“This is a testament to just how important this program is to New York,” said Ms. Wiederhorn. “Support from the state and AMSNY’s participating schools, continues to help expand the pool of underrepresented minority, educationally and economically disadvantaged students in medicine while increasing the number of qualified professionals entering the medical profession.”

AMSNY also supports other diversity in medicine programs that encourage students to pursue careers in health and medicine including: the Learning Resource Center at the Sophie Davis College of Biomedical Sciences, the Pathways to Careers in Medicine & Research Program at the City College of New York, the Physician Career Enhancement Program at Staten Island University Hospital and MCAT prep programs at several medical schools in New York State.

Roundtable Discussion on the AMS of NY Economic Impact Report

Government Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) hosted a roundtable discussion to explore the findings of a recent economic impact analysis commissioned by AMSNY. The roundtable examined how the report’s findings will impact local communities as well as the linkage between education, research and patient care. The discussion will also touch upon the future of Academic Medical Centers in New York.

According to the report, the combined total economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 out of every $13 in New York’s economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates.

AMSNY Hosts Roundtable on the Economic Impact Academic Medical Centers have on New York

Government Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today hosted a roundtable discussion on the findings of a recent economic impact report commissioned by AMSNY.

More than 90 people packed the room, including lawmakers, representatives from the governor’s office and staff from the state departments of budget, health and education. The New York State Foundation for Science, Technology and Innovation, as well as the State University of New York, also were represented.

According to the report, the academic medical centers’ combined total economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 out of every $13 in New York’s economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. Further, AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates support approximately 694,000 jobs or one in every 11 jobs in New York. It is projected by 2016, there will be more than 300,000 jobs created in New York’s education and healthcare sectors.

The roundtable, led by the Deans of New York’s medical schools, examined how the state’s academic medical centers impact local communities, and highlighted the link between education, research and patient care. The discussion also touched upon the future of academic medical centers in New York.

“New York State is home to more medical schools than any other state in the country,” said AMSNY President and Chief Executive Officer Jo Wiederhorn. “More than 8,100 medical students, 11 percent of the nation’s total, and 15,000 residents, 15 percent of the nation’s total, are trained in the state. New York is leading the nation in total employment by medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. This is an enormous accomplishment that must be recognized and fostered.”

The report also showed that between 1995 and 2008, the impact of medical institutions on the state’s economy grew by 270 percent, while the overall economy grew by only 186 percent. “The economic impact of these institutions grew 50 percent faster than New York’s overall economy over a 13-year period,” said Wiederhorn. “That’s why it is so important that lawmakers think twice about cutting programs and services that provide new jobs and new funding to the state, such as New York State’s Spinal Cord Injury Research Board and Trust Fund, Innovation Economy Matching Grants Program, and stem cell research programs, which have a direct impact on our institutions – institutions that are driving New York’s economic recovery.”

“We are living in a time of accelerated changes in health care research, and our state’s academic medical centers are uniquely positioned to lead this change,” said AMSNY Board Chairman Dr. Antonio M. Gotto Jr. “We hope this discussion has inspired New York’s decision makers and other stakeholders to make wise choices when it comes to cutting programs that impact New York’s medical centers. These institutions are important anchors of this growing sector of the state’s economy. We must do everything we can to advance these institutions, not stifle them.”

For further coverage on the discussion, click here.

AMSNY Releases Economic Impact Study

Government Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today released a report detailing the economic benefits of New York’s academic medical centers.

The 2010 report, “The Impact of Medical Education on the State of New York,” looks at the economic, educational and community benefits of New York’s 15 medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates. Using 2008 data, the report, conducted by Tripp Umbach, a private research organization, studied the impacts of these institutions on New York State.

According to the report, the combined total economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and the primary hospital affiliates.

“Our institutions have a direct and positive influence on New York’s economy,” said AMSNY Board Chairman Dr. Antonio M. Gotto Jr. “We are here in Albany today to impress upon lawmakers that every time they authorize cuts to stem cell funding, Medicaid or other health care-related programs, they are not only making it harder for our medical institutions to provide care and undertake critical research, but they are also negatively impacting the state’s economy.”

According to the report, between 1995 and 2008, the economic impact of these institutions increased by 270 percent – growing 50 percent faster than New York’s overall economy over a 13-year period.

The report also found, in 2008, New York’s academic medical centers:

  • Paid nearly $4.2 billion in state taxes, directly contributing to New York’s bottom line.
  • Generated more than $3.1 billion in medical tourism by attracting out-of-state patients, visitors and conference attendees. They also attract international dollars from outside of the U.S. in the areas of medical research and clinical expertise.
  • Yielded approximately $7.5 billion annually for New York’s economy through research efforts.
  • Supported nearly 694,000 full-time jobs.

“One in every 11 jobs in New York State is supported by our medical colleges and teaching hospitals,” said AMSNY President and Chief Executive Officer Jo Wiederhorn. “Nationally, this number is one in 46. New York is lagging behind the rest of the nation when it comes to pulling out of the recession. That’s why it is so important that lawmakers think twice about cutting programs and services that provide new jobs and new funding to the State, such as NYSTAR’s Faculty Development and Technology Transfer Incentive Programs, which have a direct impact on our institutions – institutions that are driving New York’s economic recovery.”