News

AMSNY and Bronx/Manhattan C/STEP Region Host 4th Annual College Fair at the City College of New York

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

On October 19th, 2013 the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) worked with the Bronx/Manhattan C/STEP Region to host the 4th Annual College Fair at the City College of New York.

50 colleges and universities were present, giving students the opportunity to meet with admissions representatives from across the East Coast region. In addition to speaking with admissions representatives, students also received an array of useful resources to assist them in their college decision-making process.

Parents and students also participated in workshop offerings throughout the day. Workshops included Admissions 101 and an alumni panel who discussed the high school to college transition.

The Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) and the Collegiate Science and Technology Program (CSTEP) are opportunity programs funded by the New York State Education Department. Both programs serve a population of highly motivated educationally, economically and underrepresented high-school and college students. These students are interested in entering the fields of science, technology, medicine or the allied health professions.
For more information about STEP and CSTEP, please visit: www.stepforleaders.org.

AMSNY Programs Succeed in Diversifying the Health Care Workforce

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is helping to ensure that New York’s doctors reflect the diverse backgrounds and cultures of New York’s residents and provide needed primary care in all communities statewide. The consortium of New York State’s 16 private and public medical schools recently welcomed the 22nd class of students into its Post-Baccalaureate Program housed at the University at Buffalo (UB) School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences. The program helps to identify talented students from underrepresented communities and economically disadvantaged backgrounds, and brings them into the medical profession. Upon completion of the Post-Baccalaureate program at UB, nearly all of the students matriculate into the medical school that referred them.

Since launching in 1990 with the goal of increasing diversity in medical school classes, 375 students have participated in the program. Of these students, 93 percent have entered medical school and 87 percent have graduated and pursued their medical residencies. The program is funded through a grant from the New York State Department of Health (DOH), which will be considered for renewal in the coming legislative session. The Post-Baccalaureate program’s demonstrated success supports the continuation of this vital program.

“AMSNY’s diversity programs help to ensure access to essential quality primary care in all communities,” said Jo Wiederhorn, AMSNY’s President and Chief Executive Officer. “While underrepresented minorities make up 34% percent of the New York State population, they account for only 11% percent of New York physicians. Our diversity programs bring students from underrepresented communities into the medical profession. When they become doctors, they are likely to return to those communities to practice medicine, helping to alleviate health care disparities. The AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program has been extremely successful in addressing these concerns and preparing students for the academic rigors of medical school.”

The AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program provides academic and financial support to students in a unique 12-month inter-disciplinary curriculum. It is open to students who are underrepresented in medicine, educationally or economically disadvantaged, and have been referred to the program through the admissions process at one of AMSNY’s ten participating medical schools.

“As a public medical school, the mission of the UB School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences is to advance health and wellness across New York State, said Michael E. Cain, M.D., Vice President for Health Sciences and Dean of the UB medical school. “This program is strongly supported by all the deans in the state’s medical schools because it gives underrepresented students a proven pathway toward success as medical students and later, in their careers as physicians.”

“At a time when we are looking to train more physicians, especially in primary care, and when we are interested in broadening the physician workforce to underrepresented groups, the AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program has been doing exactly that for over two decades,” said David A. Milling, M.D., UB’s Senior Associate Dean for Student and Academic Affairs. “Over the 22 years the program has been in existence, more than 300 students have participated and graduated from medical school. More than half of them went into primary care. If it were not for the opportunities provided by the post-baccalaureate program, these students absolutely would not have been able to rise to this occasion.”

When students first enter the UB program, they are evaluated to determine in which academic and social areas they need support. In addition to learning math and science, students receive formal mentoring, advising and tutoring to ensure their ultimate success. Students must receive a B or higher in all courses and must obtain a predetermined Medical College Admission Test (MCAT) score to gain acceptance. UB covers the students’ tuition and AMSNY provides funds for the students’ health insurance, books, rent and other daily living expenses, allowing them to concentrate solely on their academics. Following successful completion of the program and its requirements, the students are guaranteed admission into the referring medical school’s next class.

“After receiving my undergraduate degree at the University at Albany, I thought I was ready for medical school,” said Kevin Frison, a graduate of the AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program and now a student at Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Class of 2016. “However, after completing the AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program, I knew I was ready for medical school.”

“The program gave me the opportunity to pursue my passion and my childhood dream of becoming a physician,” said Denise Dennis, M.D., a graduate of the AMSNY/UB Post-Baccalaureate Program and now a UB medical resident. “It absolutely has served me well in terms of helping shape an early part of my career and the physician that I would become. It gave me a good launching pad and helped propel me into medicine by identifying to what expect and how to handle it all.”

The success of the AMSNY post-baccalaureate program in Buffalo led to an increase in state funding and the opportunity to expand the diversity in medicine program model. In 2008, AMSNY created master’s degree post-baccalaureate programs at SUNY Upstate Medical University, Syracuse; New York Medical College, Valhalla; and Stony Brook University School of Medicine, Stony Brook. Like the Buffalo program, the master’s degree post-baccalaureate programs serve the same student demographic. Qualifying students are referred to a master’s program through the admissions process at participating medical schools. Upon successful completion of the master’s program, the students are guaranteed admission to the referring medical school the following year.

“The AMSNY post-baccalaureate program is a phenomenal investment by the state of New York,” said Nilda Soto, Assistant Dean for Office of Diversity Enhancement at Albert Einstein College of Medicine. “Within 12 months, the program provides us with students that are committed, prepared, and will make a major difference in the medical profession.”

“For 22 years, students who have graduated from this program have gone on to be highly successful at UB’s medical school and at schools throughout the state,” said Dr. Cain. “I am proud to say that many of them, such as Dr. Dennis, have then chosen to stay on in Buffalo for their medical residencies, sharing the results of their success with our entire community.”

AMSNY also supports other diversity in medicine programs that encourage high school and college students to pursue careers in health and medicine, including the Learning Resource Center at the Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education; the Pathways to Careers in Medicine and Research Program at the City College of New York; the Physician Career Enhancement Program at Staten Island University Hospital; and MCAT prep programs at several medical schools in New York State.

***

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 16 public and private medical schools throughout New York State. AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research.

The combined total of New York’s medical schools economic impact equals more than $85.6 billion. This means $1 in every $13 in the New York economy is related to AMSNY medical schools and their primary hospital affiliates.

AMSNY is the State’s voice for medical education. Its members are:

AMSNY Joins Rally for Medical Research Hill Day in Washington, D.C.

Government Relations Committee”

As a follow-up to the April 2013 Rally for Medical Research, a broad coalition of individuals representing academic medicine, biomedical research and patient advocacy groups met with Federal lawmakers on September 18th. In total, nearly 300 people from 40 states attended meetings to express their concerns over cuts to medical research.

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) and the New York State Academic Dental Centers (NYSADC) were recognized as sponsors. AMSNY’s staff participated in the event, along with faculty from AMSNY’s member medical schools including Albert Einstein College of Medicine at Yeshiva University, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, New York University School of Medicine, and Weill Cornell Medical College. The New York group met with the offices of Senators Charles Schumer and Kirsten Gillibrand, as well as with several other New York House of Representative members. A simple message was relayed in each meeting: there must not be any more cuts to medical research and sequestration must be eliminated from the federal budget.

The New York congressional delegation continues to be be very supportive of sufficient funding for medical research and strongly believes in the Rally for Medical Research mission. Moving forward, the medical research community will showcase research success stories and highlight the severe consequences to future health outcomes if medical research continues to decline. Effective advocacy efforts must continue in order to bring both sides of the political aisle together to invest in medical research for the health and security of the country.


Photo credit: American Association for Cancer Research

New York's Medical Schools Add 2,424 Future Doctors to the Pipeline

Public Relations Committee”

AMSNY schools continue to expand their medical school classes, reaffirming their commitment to training more physicians and providing high quality care to all New York State residents.

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today reported that 2,424 new medical students enrolled this fall in the state’s 16 medical schools – an enrollment increase of 120 since last year.* Of the incoming class, 47 percent are women and three percent are international students. More than half of matriculating students are New York State residents.

“New York’s health care landscape is changing rapidly due to an aging population, rising costs and policy changes at the State and Federal level. As a result, the demand for physicians has intensified,” said Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO of AMSNY.

According to the Center for Health Workforce Studies, a University at Albany School of Public Health research center, demand continues to grow for primary care physicians as well as specialists, with demand expected to outpace supply by 2015. The diversity and distribution of physicians are other crucial factors in ensuring an effective health care system in New York.

State-funded programs, such as AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate programs, are helping to diversify the physician population by preparing students from educationally or economically underrepresented backgrounds for medical school through individualized academic enrichment, mentoring and support. Overall, 93 percent of students in AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate programs matriculate into medical school.

“New York’s medical schools continue efforts to produce a highly qualified and diverse physician workforce in addition to developing innovative curricula that will ensure future physicians have the knowledge, empathy and understanding to care for patients of today and tomorrow,” said Ms. Wiederhorn.

To mark their first steps towards becoming physicians, medical students across the state are participating in ‘white coat ceremonies’ at their institutions, donning the physician’s traditional white garb for the first time.

“The white coat ceremony is a rite of passage, an acknowledgement of the students’ achievements thus far, and serves as a symbol of an ongoing commitment to the profession of medicine and the ethical and moral obligations students are expected to uphold,” said Ms. Wiederhorn.

Highlights from this year’s new class of medical students include:

  • Albany Medical College welcomed 143 medical students, with 74 men and 69 women. Drawn from nearly 9,000 applicants, this year’s students come from 27 states, including 43 students from New York, and 60 different undergraduate schools. This year’s class ranges in age from 20 to 35. Three students are from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program. Thirty-eight of the new students graduated from one of Albany Medical College’s joint degree programs at Siena College, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and Union College. Thirty-nine are entering with master’s degrees, and while the majority holds undergraduate degrees in biology, some majors include anthropology, art and music.
  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University welcomed 183 students to its Class of 2017. Forty percent of the class is from New York State. Two students from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program are among the new students. Twenty-one play at least one instrument, 26 are trained EMTs and one is an Eagle Scout. What’s more, students have volunteered with organizations such as Back on My Feet, Domestic Abuse Project, Open Door Shelter, the American Cancer Society, Animal Haven Shelter, AmeriCorps, Habitat for Humanity, Meals on Wheels, the Peace Corps, Boy Scouts of America, Big Brothers Big Sisters and Hospice, and more.
  • Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons entering class has 168 students, representing 32 states and five countries. More than 7,800 applications were submitted. Six students are graduates of Columbia’s Summer Medical and Dental Education Program, Summer Public Health Scholars Program, or Strategic Testing Application Techniques (STAT) Program, which help underrepresented students pursue careers in medicine. The first four students in the school’s new three-year MD program, which is for students who have a PhD in biomedical sciences, started with the Class of 2017.
  • Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine welcomed 80 students, including 37 women and 43 men. All hailing from the U.S., the Class of 2017 has a diverse educational background. A student from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program is among the incoming class. Students have degrees in biology, English, anthropology, human development, religion, neuroscience, psychology, biomedical engineering, astronomy, physics, chemistry, economics and sociology. Nearly half of the class is from New York State.
  • Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai enrolled 140 students out of more than 5,000 applicants this year. The class is comprised of 71 men and 69 women, from 70 different undergraduate schools.
  • New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine welcomed 315 students to the Class of 2017. The school received 6,200 applicants this year, which was the largest number of applicants in the school’s 36-year history. Seventy percent of the students are New York State residents. Other states of origin include: CT, IL, CA, CO, MI, KS, OH, and MI. Among the new students is a former principal cellist of the Boston Youth Symphony.
  • New York Medical College welcomed 200 new students, with 94 women and 106 men, to the incoming class, which also included six of AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate students. There were 12,077 applications to the medical school this year. The enrolled students come from 28 different states and represent 95 undergraduate schools across the country.
  • NYU School of Medicine’s incoming class is comprised of 75 women and 87 men for a total of 162 students. They hail from 25 states, plus Canada, and represent 75 undergraduate schools. Sixteen students are participants of the new three-year medical degree program. Student backgrounds range from an investment banker, a freelance film maker, an open water diver, a competitive figure skater, a paper airplane throwing competitor, and a U.S. Navy fighter jet pilot.
  • University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry welcomed a new class of 102 medical students. The class includes five students that entered under Rochester’s Early Medical Scholars Program, seven from the Bryn Mawr post-baccalaureate program, seven of Rochester’s Early Assurance Program, and nine MD/PhD students in the Medical Scientist Training Program. Seven students have Masters degrees in diverse fields. Of special interest, three students train and/or are skilled horseback riders, one student ran in the Umstead 100 mile ultra-marathon, and another student spent a month on a submarine.
  • Sophie Davis School of Biomedical Education enrolled 74 students this year out of a total of 705 applicants. All students enroll directly from high school, so the age range is from 16 to 18 years of age. There are 45 female and 29 male students, all of which are New York State residents. Sixty-six percent of the students are from the five boroughs of New York City. Sophie Davis’ White Coat Ceremony is held at the beginning of the third year at the school.
  • Stony Brook University School of Medicine welcomed 124 new medical students this year, 77 percent of which were New York State residents. The School of Medicine received an all-time high of 5,196 applicants. Five students were accepted via Scholars for Medicine, which is a combined bachelors/medical degree program, and five matriculate from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program. Six are MD/PhD students and twelve students have advanced degrees.
  • The School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York (SUNY), welcomed a new class of 144 medical students. The class includes 117 New York State residents, 63 from Western New York. Twenty-one are UB graduates and four successfully completed AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program. Members of the Class of 2017 have traveled to several nations, including Ecuador, Kenya, India and the Philippines, to assist physicians caring for underserved patients.
  • Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine welcomed 135 students from 25 states. Nearly 40 percent of students are from New York State. From an applicant pool of more than 5,000, there are 60 women and 75 men in the Class of 2017.
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center welcomed 188 new medical students (78 women and 110 men) to their Class of 2017. The age of the students ranged from 21 to 35, and 80 percent of the entering class are New York State residents. Three students are joining the class from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program. Thirty-five students are coming from local Brooklyn neighborhoods and, collectively, Downstate’s new class of students speaks 40 different languages, in addition to English.
  • SUNY Upstate Medical University enrolled 165 medical students (77 women and 88 men). This year’s incoming class is made up of 90 percent New York State residents with the highest MCAT verbal reasoning score for an incoming class to date. Among the new students, five are pursuing MD/PhD degrees and 27 hold advanced degrees. Six students from AMSNY’s post-baccalaureate program are also joining the class. A total of 77 undergraduate colleges are represented.
  • Weill Cornell Medical College’s class of 101 students hail from 19 U.S. states and attended 58 different undergraduate institutions. The Class of 2017 has significant global ties. They have worked, volunteered, and/or studied abroad in more than 40 countries spanning six continents. Eighty-four of the incoming students speak at least one foreign language; 53 know Spanish. The incoming class can collectively translate 24 languages.

* In the fall of 2012, AMSNY announced 2,230 new medical students enrolled in New York State’s medical schools. This number did not include the 74 students from Sophie Davis, which was unavailable at the time. This year’s number of 2,424 new medical students includes Sophie Davis students.

###



The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is the State’s voice for medical education. Its members are:

Accomplished Musician Begins Osteopathic Medical Education at NYIT

Learning the strains of Ernest Bloch’s Schelomo on her beloved cello just may have been the perfect prelude to Veronika Blinder’s education as an osteopathic physician.

The hands of the 25-year-old first-year student at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine are already finely tuned, courtesy of 22 years devoted to practicing and performing.

“Hopefully I’ll be quickly able to adapt to this osteopathic technique,” said Blinder recently as she prepared to begin her NYIT medical school career. “I understand the concept that your fingers and hands are very sensitive and can do so many things. I’m excited to use my hands.”

The power of touch and sensory perception are familiar lessons, honed since the age of three, when her mother, a piano teacher, first introduced her to music.

“My mom tried to give me a piano lesson but she stopped because she said it was impossible,” said Blinder.

She chose to learn cello instead, and as a teenager, was named principal cellist in the Boston Youth Symphony Orchestra. While she always knew she wanted to be a doctor, Blinder continued musical studies and pursued a minor in music at Wellesley, where she majored in biology. She recently brought her cello to her new off-campus apartment in Sea Cliff.

“You form this really intense bond with your instrument,” she said. “It becomes your companion and how you express yourself when you play.”

Blinder chose NYIT, she says, after having receiving successful “trigger point therapy” for a shoulder injury and hearing a medical professional speak highly of OMM, osteopathic manual medicine.

“I think it’s going to be really interesting,” she said, referring to the special techniques and training in OMM and the “whole body” approach followed by osteopathic physicians.

The mother of a two-year-old boy and wife of a professional cellist, Blinder hopes to specialize in internal medicine as a primary care physician but is also interested in emergency medicine. She has worked as an EMT, and has spent time researching Alzheimer’s disease at Harvard Medical School.

Blinder described her orientation as “kind of like being on a cloud,” but was quickly impressed by NYIT COM’s faculty and her fellow students. She was happy to receive a high grade on her first anatomy quiz.

“I’m really, really enjoying myself,” she said. “This is what I’ve wanted to do my whole life.”



About NYIT

New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) offers 90 degree programs, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees, in more than 50 fields of study, including architecture and design; arts and sciences; education; engineering and computing sciences; health professions; management; and osteopathic medicine. A non-profit independent, private institution of higher education, NYIT has 13,000 students attending campuses on Long Island and Manhattan, online, and at its global campuses. NYIT sponsors 11 NCAA Division II programs and one Division I team.

Led by President Edward Guiliano, NYIT is guided by its mission to provide career-oriented professional education, offer access to opportunity to all qualified students, and support applications-oriented research that benefits the larger world. To date, more than 95,000 graduates have received degrees from NYIT. For more information, visit nyit.edu.

Contact:
Elaine Iandoli
Writer/Reporter
(516) 686-4013

"Through the Lens" at NYIT College of Osteopathic Medicine

Gazing at the Holon Design Museum in Israel late last year, Tamara Hagoel was struck by intriguing patterns of light, shadow, and fluid curves of weathered steel bands that define and support the building. Hagoel, a fourth-year student at New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine, captured handsome images on her camera, but saw them in a different light when she returned home.

“Later on, when I was looking at my photos, it reminded me of the ribcage,” she said, referring to the structure of the museum’s unique exterior design.

In Hagoel’s photograph, shot at an angle with a brilliant blue sky background, it appears as if the viewer is peering through the body’s ribs from inside the thoracic cavity.

The photograph won first place in the New Perspectives category of the College of Osteopathic Medicine’s “Through the Lens Initiative,” created by Dean Wolfgang Gilliar, DO, to generate photographs that relate to the school’s “Hands, Minds, and Hearts” motto.

“We thought to add a small but meaningful humanistic component to what we do and simply want to stimulate our students’ and faculty’s senses through a fun and active initiative,” said Gilliar, who worked decades ago as an official photographer for a political figure. “Harnessing the sense of seeing- either while actively taking photographs or simply viewing subjects – and then reflecting on what is seen will help sharpen the sense of observation.”

The initiatives themes for the rest of the year are: Hands and Touch; Minds: Thinking Further; and Hearts: Emotions and Reflections. The school will display large-scale winning photographs throughout its buildings and will award small monetary prizes to first-, second-, and third-place winners.

“I like building design, geometry, and shapes,” said Hagoel, who studied urban design and architecture as an undergraduate student, along with pre-med courses. “Whenever I see something that speaks to me, I try to take a lot of pictures.”

Currently in an internal medicine rotation at Queens Hospital Center in Jamaica, NY, Hagoel hopes to attain a residency in pediatrics.

“I really like working with kids and I think they’re really inspiring,” she says. “I think I can use my creativity to connect with them.”


About NYIT
New York Institute of Technology (NYIT) offers 90 degree programs, including undergraduate, graduate, and professional degrees, in more than 50 fields of study, including architecture and design; arts and sciences; education; engineering and computing sciences; health professions; management; and osteopathic medicine. A non-profit independent, private institution of higher education, NYIT has 13,000 students attending campuses on Long Island and Manhattan, online, and at its global campuses. NYIT sponsors 11 NCAA Division II programs and one Division I team.

Led by President Edward Guiliano, NYIT is guided by its mission to provide career-oriented professional education, offer access to opportunity to all qualified students, and support applications-oriented research that benefits the larger world. To date, more than 95,000 graduates have received degrees from NYIT. For more information, visit nyit.edu.

Contact:
Elaine Iandoli
Writer/Reporter
(516) 686-4013

NYS Deans Go To Washington, D.C. for AMSNY's Annual Advocacy Days

On July 23-24, 2013, deans from eight of the New York State medical schools participated in the Associated Medical Schools of New York’s (AMSNY) annual advocacy days in Washington, D.C.

The deans conducted 20 meetings over the two-day visit, including 15 members of the New York State Congressional Delegation and Senator Charles E. Schumer. In addition, AMSNY met with House Republican leadership: House Majority Leader Eric Cantor; Vice Chair of the House’s Budget Committee, Tom Price, MD; and Vice Chairman of the House’s Subcommittee on Health, Michael Burgess, MD. Pat White, Associate Director for Policy at the National Institutes of Health (NIH), was the invited guest to a breakfast meeting that focused on the future of the NIH, including the impact of sequestration on funding priorities and grant awards.

The discussions at each of the meetings focused on three priority areas for the medical schools: cuts in the NIH budget; the need for additional residency training slots; and reforms to the Higher Education Act, Title IV student loan program. All of the members agreed that biomedical research saves lives and ultimately saves money through the development of preventive therapeutics, and all agreed upon the need for more residency slots given the growing physician shortage. However, the impasse around the Federal budget and the sequester remains.

The group of deans included:

Lee Goldman, MD, MPHAMSNY Chair
Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons

Michael Cain, MDAMSNY Vice Chair
School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo

Mark Taubman, MDAMSNY Treasurer
University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry

Allen M. Spiegel, MD
Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Wolfgang Gilliar, DO
New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine

David B. Duggan, MD
SUNY Upstate Medical University

Robert Goldberg, DO
Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine

Laurie Glimcher, MD
Weill Cornell Medical College

Jo Wiederhorn
President and Chief Executive Officer, AMSNY


Congressman Charles B. Rangel (D-NY) with the medical school deans and AMSNY representatives.

Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney (D-NY) with the medical school deans and AMSNY.

(Left to right: Lee Goldman, MD, MPH, Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons; Allen Spiegel, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Wolfgang Gilliar, DO, New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine; Congresswoman Carolyn Maloney; Jo Wiederhorn, AMSNY; Robert Goldberg, DO, Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine.)

Congresswoman Grace Meng (D-NY) with the medical school deans.

(Left to right: Mark Taubman, MD, University of Rochester School of Medicine and Dentistry; Michael Cain, MD, School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo; Wolfgang Gilliar, DO, New York Institute of Technology College of Osteopathic Medicine; Congresswoman Grace Meng; Allen Spiegel, MD, Albert Einstein College of Medicine; Jo Wiederhorn, AMSNY; David Duggan, MD, SUNY Upstate Medical University; Robert Goldberg, DO, Touro College of Osteopathic Medicine.)

Data Show NY Need for Primary Health Care Doctors

New York’s medical community worries that adding 1.1 million people to insurance rolls under the federal health care overhaul will overwhelm primary care physicians, many of whom are already swamped.

Associated Medical Schools of New York said this year about half of 2,160 graduating medical students will stay in the state for their residencies. Enrollment at the 16 schools has increased 14 percent over the past decade and several of the schools plan to increase class sizes or launch programs to train doctors for underserved, rural areas.

For the full story, click here.
© 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.


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NYS Medical Schools Graduate 2,224 New Doctors

This year, 2,224 students graduated from New York State’s medical schools.

For more information about commencement at each medical school:

For AMSNY’s full press release on 2013 Match Day at the medical schools, click here.



The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the 16 public and private medical schools across the State. Its mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care and research.

Researchers Shed New Light On Egg Freezing Success Rates

Researchers from New York Medical College and the University of California Davis have for the first time codified age-specific probabilities of live birth after in vitro fertilization (IVF) with frozen eggs.

A team of researchers led by Kutluk Oktay, M.D., a New York Medical College physician/scientist who specializes in preserving the fertility of female cancer patients, conducted a meta-analysis of oocyte cryopreservation cycles using individualized patient data to report the probability of live-birth from IVF cycles.

The study, “Age-specific probability of live birth with oocyte cryopreservation: an individual patient data meta-analysis,” was published in the online May issue of the American Society for Reproductive Medicine’s journal Fertility and Sterility.

For the full story, click here.
© 2013 New York Medical College. All rights reserved.

Contact:

Donna Moriarty
donna_moriarty@nymc.edu