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Diversity in Medical Education: Facts & Figures (2012)

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

The Association of American Medical Colleges (AAMC) is pleased to present Diversity in Medical Education: Facts & Figures 2012, the 17th data book in the Facts & Figures Data Series. This publication provides students, medical educators and administrators, researchers, policymakers, and the general public with a compendium of detailed statistical information on race and ethnicity and gender in medical education in the United States for the 2011 academic year as well as nearly a decade’s worth of trending information for select topics. The publication also includes data related to the pre-college component of the education pipeline leading to the M.D. degree and other health sciences and health professions careers.

According to the report, Caucasian applicants declined approximately 26 percent over the past three decades and, in 2011, half of all applicants were nonwhite.

For the full publication, click here.
© 2012 Association of American Medical Colleges. All rights reserved.

Doctor Shortage: Condition Critical (Results of HANYS' 2012 Physician Advocacy Survey)

Primary care physicians are at the forefront of a physician shortage that continues to worsen in New York State, according to HANYS’ 2012 Physician Workforce Survey. As the Affordable Care Act’s (ACA) health insurance expansion takes effect and state Medicaid reform that encourages care coordination and population health is implemented, ensuring a sufficient number of physicians will be key to the success of these critical changes. It is vital that New York State have a comprehensive strategy to establish appropriate numbers of physicians to care for all New Yorkers.

Governor Andrew Cuomo and the state Department of Health have made a strong commitment to primary care, not only through the creation of the Office of Primary Care, but through the entire Medicaid redesign process and the 1115 waiver. Building on this commitment will go a long way to ameliorate the problems New York health care providers currently face. Doctors Across New York (DANY) must continue to be funded at a level that will attract hundreds of physicians needed in under-served areas in New York State.

Key Findings

  • More than 1,200 physicians are needed including 374 primary care physicians (31%);
  • While nearly 2400 physicians were recruited in 2011, over 2500 either left the area or retired, resulting in a net loss;
  • Excluding the Nassau-Suffolk region, 75% of emergency departments had no coverage for certain specialties due to the shortage, resulting in the need to transfer patients to other hospitals;
  • 32% of hospitals had to either reduce or eliminate hospital services due to the physician shortage;
  • 110 hospitals responded to this survey, for an overall response rate of 73% of NYS hospitals, excluding NYC.

For the full results, click here.
© 2012-2013 Healthcare Association of New York State. All rights reserved.

Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center Recommended to Receive $14.9 Million to Develop Promising Treatment for Parkinson’s Disease

Government Relations Committee”Public Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today announced that the Empire State Stem Cell Board (NYSTEM) has recommended approximately $14.9 million in funding be awarded to Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to develop an innovative stem-cell therapy that is predicted to increase motor control and coordination in patients suffering from Parkinson’s disease.

“The recommendation to finance this promising research is yet another outstanding example of the effectiveness of New York’s stem cell program, NYSTEM,” said Dr. Lorenz Studer, principal investigator (PI) and Director of the Center for Stem Cell Biology at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center. “This funding will allow our team to advance our novel cell therapy quickly and bring the project to the level of clinical trials within four years. NYSTEM funding is absolutely critical at this stage as no other funding source is available.”

Once the project enters the clinical trial phase, researchers hope to permanently alleviate or reverse the debilitating symptoms of the disease in Parkinson’s patients.

“This recommended funding is critical to advancing Parkinson’s disease research,” said State Health Commissioner, Nirav R. Shah, M.D., M.P.H. “These resources will enable the outstanding team at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center to continue their vital efforts to halt the progression of Parkinson’s disease.”

The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation defines Parkinson’s disease as a chronic and progressive movement disorder, meaning that symptoms continue and worsen over time. Nearly one million people in the U.S. are living with Parkinson’s disease. The cause is unknown, and presently there is no cure.

Parkinson’s involves the malfunction and death of vital nerve cells in the brain, called neurons. Neurons produce dopamine, a chemical that sends messages to the part of the brain that controls movement and coordination. As Parkinson’s progresses, the amount of dopamine produced in the brain decreases, leaving a person unable to control movement normally.

“After extensive efforts and many years of frustrating studies in labs across the world, our team has finally made a breakthrough discovery that enables the derivation of nearly unlimited numbers of authentic midbrain dopamine producing neurons from stem cells,” said Dr. Studer. “The NYSTEM funding will enable our team to develop these neurons and ultimately prepare them to be safely reintroduced to patients with Parkinson’s, replenishing their dopamine levels.”

While pharmacological, gene therapy and surgical therapies have been developed for Parkinson’s, none of those approaches can restore proper dopamine neuron function, and long-term disease control for patients is limited.

The Parkinson’s Disease Foundation estimates the combined direct and indirect cost of Parkinson’s, including treatment, social security payments and lost income from inability to work, to be nearly $25 billion per year in the United States alone. Medication costs for an individual with Parkinson’s average $2,500 a year, and therapeutic surgery can cost up to $100,000 per patient.

“Quickly advancing this project could potentially save patients and the state millions in medical care costs, while improving the health and well-being of millions of Parkinson’s patients across the globe,” said Dr. Studer.

In 2007, New York State allocated $600 million over 11 years to NYSTEM, making it the second largest publicly financed stem cell program in the country. To date, New York has awarded nearly $200 million and has recommended an additional $62.2 million to support stem cell research for the purpose of exploring innovative cures and treatment to life threatening and chronic illnesses.

According to a 2012 AMSNY report, the state’s investment has been a tool for economic development by creating more than 400 jobs at New York’s medical schools since the program’s inception. In addition, NYSTEM is unique in that it funds early stage projects that have not been able to access other funding sources such as those granted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NYSTEM also is distinct among other research grants in that it provides funding for capital projects and equipment, allowing institutions to develop or expand their stem cell research infrastructure.

“Not only are physicians and scientists making progress towards understanding how to effectively treat Parkinson’s disease, they are also generating jobs, attracting promising young women and men into medical and scientific careers here in New York, and enhancing our state’s leadership in biomedical research,” said Jo Wiederhorn. “None of this would have been possible without NYSTEM.”

AMSNY is New York’s voice for medical education. It is comprised of the sixteen public and private medical schools in NYS. Its members are:

For more information, please contact:
Deborah Fasser
dfasser@corningplace.com


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© 2013 Michael J. Fox Foundation. All rights reserved.

NYU School of Medicine Debuts Three-Year M.D. Program

NYU School of Medicine announced today that it will begin offering a new accelerated three-year Doctor of Medicine (MD) degree, approved earlier this month by the New York State Education Department. NYU School of Medicine is the first nationally ranked academic medical center in the United States to offer such a program that allows graduates to pursue a career in either primary care or the medical specialty of their choice.

The new learner-centered program revolutionizes medical education by reducing the length of the traditional MD degree, allowing exceptional medical students to begin their careers earlier in a variety of fields and with less debt. Another integral feature of the new program is that all three-year degree candidates will also be offered acceptance into an NYU Langone Medical Center residency program of their choice at the time of admission, providing a continuum of training between undergraduate medical education and graduate residency training.

For the full article, click here.
© 2012 New York University School of Medicine. All rights reserved.

Consortium of Three Upstate New York Medical Schools Recommended to Receive More Than $12.1 Million for Promising Clinical Trial

Government Relations Committee”Public Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today announced that the Empire State Stem Cell Board (NYSTEM) has recommended more than $12.1 million in funding be awarded to a collaborative effort between the State University of New York (SUNY) Upstate Medical University in Syracuse; the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, SUNY; and the University of Rochester Medical Center.

The grant’s focus is on a groundbreaking medical treatment that addresses the underlying causes of physical failure in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). State funding would enable the three medical schools to advance their project quickly, bringing their research to the level of clinical trials in three to four years. The clinical trials would aim to halt the progression of disability in MS patients and possibly provide functional improvement.

“The recommendation to finance this promising research is a monumental step forward for New York’s stem cell program, as well as for the two million people worldwide who are affected by this debilitating condition,” said Dr. Michael Cain, AMSNY’s Vice-Chair, and Vice President for Health Sciences and Dean at the School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo. “This collaborative effort will link the medical schools in western and upstate New York, leveraging a broader range of expertise and knowledge of this disease and potentially transforming MS therapies.”

State Health Commissioner Nirav R. Shah, M.D., M.P.H., said, “This recommended grant funding will enable these upstate, NY institutions to accelerate this essential project by moving their research toward clinical trials. The collaborative research efforts of these outstanding scientists show great promise in preventing the progression of MS.”

The National Multiple Sclerosis Society defines multiple sclerosis (MS) as a chronic, often disabling disease that attacks the central nervous system, which is made up of the brain, spinal cord, and optic nerves. Symptoms may be mild, such as numbness in the limbs, or severe, such as paralysis or loss of vision. The progress, severity and specific symptoms of MS are unpredictable and vary from one person to another.

“Typically diagnosed between ages 20 and 40, MS is one of the most frequent neurological diseases affecting young adults today and is extremely prevalent in New York – in fact New York has one of the highest MS populations in the country,” said Dr. Burk Jubelt, principal investigator (PI) of the project and professor of Neurology, Microbiology and Immunology at SUNY Upstate University. “What happens in patients with MS is myelin, the fatty substance that surrounds and protects the nerve fibers in the central nervous system, is damaged, as well as the nerve fibers themselves. The damaged myelin forms scar tissue – or sclerosis – which gives the disease its name. When any part of the myelin sheath or nerve fiber is damaged or destroyed, nerve impulses traveling to and from the brain and spinal cord are distorted or interrupted, producing the variety of symptoms that can occur.”

“Today, while there are medications designed to slow MS progression, they neither stop the disease process nor alleviate damage that’s already occurred,” said Dr. Steven Goldman, co-PI and chairman emeritus of the Department of Neurology at the University of Rochester, and co-director of its Center for Translational Neuromedicine. “There is no cure. Ultimately patients go on to develop secondary progressive MS, which is much more debilitating and has no specific therapy. Our study may, in fact, change all of this by preventing disease progression to the secondary stage while repairing damage already done, hence bringing new hope to people affected by the disease.”

According to Dr. Andrew Goodman, co-PI and director of the Multiple Sclerosis Center at the University of Rochester Medical Center, the anticipated clinical trial would implant special cells that can reproduce myelin, into the central nervous system of MS patients. “If successful, transplantation of cells that can repair damaged myelin may reverse some of the symptoms and slow the tendency for worsening of the condition over time,” said Dr. Goodman. “It is hoped that this will also protect the nerves and prevent further progression of disability.”

More than 30,000 individuals live with MS in New York State, with the highest concentration residing in upstate regions surrounding the three medical schools hosting the clinical trial. The condition imposes substantial economic burdens on patients, their families and the community as a whole. These burdens include medical care costs, special housing and home care costs, and loss of quality of life. And because it affects young adults, it has a significant impact on New York’s workforce.

“Many MS patients are forced to abandon their jobs and collect unemployment or look for alternative employment once they enter the secondary stage of the disease,” said Dr. Bianca Guttman-Weinstock, co-PI and professor of Neurology at the University at Buffalo. “Based on 2007 cost data from the Multiple Sclerosis International Federation, MS is estimated to cost patients in the United States $50,000 or more per person on an annual basis. Over a lifetime this equates to more than $2.2 million – with the most expensive segment occurring during the secondary stage. Advancing this project quickly will save patients and the state millions in medical care costs while improving the health and well-being of thousands in our community, and millions worldwide.”

In 2007, New York State allocated $600 million over 11 years to the Empire State Stem Cell Program (NYSTEM), making it the second largest publically financed stem cell program in the country. To date, New York has awarded nearly $200 million and has recommended an additional $62.2 million of the $600 million to support stem cell research for the purpose of exploring innovative cures and treatment to life threatening and chronic illnesses.

“The committed NYSTEM funding is critical to advancing MS research that has the potential to stop MS and potentially restore function lost to MS,” reports Dr. Timothy Coetzee, chief research officer at the National MS Society. “This promising approach not only assists people with MS move forward with their lives, but it could also help reduce the $28 billion impact that MS costs the economy each year.”

In addition to supporting groundbreaking stem cell research projects, the state’s investment has been a tool for economic development by creating or maintaining more than 400 jobs at AMSNY institutions since the program’s inception. It is attracting world-renowned researchers and scientists to New York.

According to a 2012 AMSNY report, New York’s funding commitment is critical to the state’s stem cell research and patient communities given its unique nature. NYSTEM funds early stage projects that have not been able to access other funding sources such as those granted by the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NYSTEM also is distinct among other research grants in that it provides funding for capital projects and equipment, allowing institutions to develop or expand their stem cell research infrastructure.

“Not only are physicians and scientists making progress towards understanding how to treat and prevent MS, they are generating jobs, attracting promising young women and men into medical and scientific careers here in New York, and enhancing our state’s leadership in biomedical research,” said Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO of AMSNY. “None of this would have been possible without NYSTEM.”

AMSNY is New York’s voice for medical education. It is comprised of the sixteen public and private medical schools in NYS. Its members are:

For more information, please contact:
Deborah Fasser
dfasser@corningplace.com


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New York’s Medical Schools Urge Congress to Preserve Federal Funding for Scientific Research & Workforce Development

Government Relations Committee”Public Relations Committee”

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) today directed a letter to the New York State Congressional Delegation calling on them to reject a nearly 10-percent cut to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Medicare and Title VII health professions programs, that will take effect January 2, 2013.

A morning press conference was held at Columbia University Medical Center, where U.S. Representatives Charles Rangel, Jerrold Nadler, Carolyn Maloney, other elected officials, members of AMSNY and the medical schools were joined by patients whose lives have been transformed by research efforts funded by the NIH. Dr. Lee Goldman, AMSNY’s Chair, and Executive Vice President and Dean of the Columbia University College of Physicians & Surgeons, attested to the impact of NIH-funded research on the advancement of medical care in New York State and the entire nation. The event was moderated by Jo Wiederhorn, President and Chief Executive Officer of AMSNY.

Dr. Edward Halperin, the Chancellor for Health Affairs and Chief Executive Officer of New York Medical College, Dr. Allen Spiegel, the Dean of Albert Einstein College of Medicine, and Dr. Henry Lander, the Assistant Provost for Research Administration at Weill Cornell Medical College, were available for the Q & A session following the speaker panel.

“In order to meet the health challenges of an aging and increasingly diverse population, continue to foster the types of innovation that will drive our regional economy, and remain a vibrant force in the global economy, we need to invest more in medical research and the health care workforce, not less,” said Dr. Lee Goldman. “Cuts to vital research and educational programs will delay medical progress and deny hope to millions of Americans.“

The AMSNY letter states that “the Office of Management and Budget (OMB) estimates the pending sequestration action will reduce NIH funding in FY 2013 by $2.5 billion. Medical schools and teaching hospitals would lose more than $1 billion nationally. Approximately $167 million in funding would be lost in New York State alone. According to a 2010 Tripp Umbach report commissioned by AMSNY, the state receives an economic return of $7.50 for each research dollar invested in New York’s medical schools. Therefore, a $167 million loss in NIH funding would equate to an overall loss of approximately $1.25 billion to New York’s economy and result in lost jobs.”

“The high quality of medical care we enjoy today is built upon years of effort by physicians, scientists and other medical professionals investigating the causes of, and potential treatments for, disease,” said Dr. Goldman. “For millions of patients and their families, medical research means hope. It is the promise for a future that will alleviate pain and illness for those suffering from diseases such as cancer, diabetes, Alzheimer’s, depression, and Parkinson’s. To fully realize this hope, we must sustain federal support for the NIH.”

As the largest federal funding agency for medical research, NIH invested more than $30 billion in FY 2012. More than 80 percent of the NIH’s budget goes to more than 300,000 research personnel at more than 2,500 universities and research institutions across the country. More than half of this funding goes to medical schools and teaching hospitals. These institutions are committed to pioneering tomorrow’s cures and medical advances, and bringing them to patients.

U.S. Representative Charles B. Rangel said, “We cannot afford these cuts. New York’s medical schools and teaching hospitals have pioneered the latest technologies and new cures for patients through their cutting-edge research. These institutions have dramatically improved Americans’ health and helped place our nation as the world’s leader in biomedical research. We must not jeopardize efforts to advance medical innovation.”

U.S. Representative Eliot Engel, a senior member of the House Energy and Commerce Committee’s Subcommittee on Health said, “I voted against the Budget Control Act because Congress must make these tough budgetary decisions, not the President, not any ‘Super Committee.’ Sequestration was the result of the Budget Control Act’s failure. Congress must do its job and pass a realistic deficit plan, not pass the buck. We have to work together and make the tough decisions we were elected to make. The cuts that are part of sequestration were supposed to be a deterrent to gridlock, as they are odious to everyone, especially New York’s hospitals and medical research efforts. We have to strike a real deal to avoid these cuts, and bring our nation’s debt under control.”

U.S. Representative Nita Lowey stated, “It is critical for medical schools and research institutions in New York and nationwide to replace arbitrary and reckless cuts from sequestration with targeted reductions that do not jeopardize our health and competitiveness. I will work with Dean Goldman and all New York research institutions to prevent these short-sighted cuts from occurring.”

U.S. Representative Carolyn B. Maloney said, “New York’s world-class hospitals and medical research facilities are not just the crown jewels of our nation’s health care system, they are a key driver behind our economic recovery and job growth, as well as a prime source for advances in combating disease and the development of cutting-edge technology. We must avoid triggering a sequestration of federal funding that will inflict devastating cuts to the research and development programs that are our hope for the future. I am determined to join colleagues in both parties and both houses of Congress to prevent our nation from being hijacked off the fiscal cliff.”

U.S. Representative Jerry Nadler stated, “Sequestration would have catastrophic effects on our economy, on jobs, and on the health care and services that millions of Americans depend on. If the National Institutes of Health suffer 8.2% cuts as planned, we would lose thousands of good local jobs and vital health care funding that New Yorkers depend on. Our children, seniors, middle class and low income people cannot afford such a blow, especially in the midst of a protracted recession.”

Dr. Allen M. Spiegel, the Marilyn and Stanley M. Katz Dean of Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University, said, “Now, when our ability to understand cancer, Alzheimer’s, autism and many other diseases has never been greater, is exactly the wrong time to cut potentially life-saving research supported by NIH.”

Dr. Kenneth Kaushansky, Senior Vice President for the Health Sciences and Dean of the Stony Brook University School of Medicine, said, “Major cuts to National Institutes of Health funding that supports medical research would be devastating to the progress of academic medicine, a vital component driving the success of new discoveries and innovations to fight and cure disease. The NIH is the largest source of federal research funding to Stony Brook Medicine. This funding is absolutely critical to advancing our research on next-generation diagnostics and therapeutics for cancer, heart disease, and other conditions affecting millions.”

Dr. Ian Taylor, Dean of SUNY Downstate Medical Center’s College of Medicine, said, “As an academic medical center in an inner-city environment, SUNY Downstate is acutely aware of how economic pressures can have a negative impact on providing clinical care, educating and training new health professionals, and conducting medical research. We urge Congress and the Administration to work together to avoid the sequestration mandated by the Budget Control Act and instead to continue to invest in health care, health education, and the research that brings new medical treatments to the marketplace.”

Dr. David Duggan, Interim Dean of SUNY Upstate Medical University, said, “We must avoid the devastating and unwarranted cuts to the National Institutes of Health, Title VII health professions training programs, and Medicare that would further reduce our nations health care workforce and undermine the research that has the promise to improve care for patients with diseases like cancer, neurological diseases and diabetes. The health of our children is too important to sacrifice.”

Dr. Laurie H. Glimcher, the Stephen and Suzanne Weiss Dean of Weill Cornell Medical College, said, “Federal research funding through the National Institutes of Health provides the backbone for scientific discoveries in laboratories throughout the country and a vital economic engine in the communities that host them. Clinical therapies developed from these discoveries improve and save lives every day. Congress must act to avert the NIH cuts that would result from sequestration for both New York’s economy and for the health of all New Yorkers.”

The Congressional Delegation was also asked to oppose Medicare reductions that will limit educational and research initiatives at teaching hospitals, as well as funding cuts to Title VII, which supports the training of a diverse health care workforce.

“Maintaining current funding levels for NIH, Medicare and Title VII is critical to the economic well-being of New York State, as well as that of the nation,” said Dr. Goldman.

About AMSNY: The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the sixteen public and private medical schools across the State. Its mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the NYS medical schools can provide outstanding medical education, care and research.

For more information, please contact:
Deborah Fasser
dfasser@corningplace.com


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2012 Election Recap

Government Relations Committee”

New Yorkers came out in large numbers to vote for Presidential, U.S. Senator, the state’s 27 House seats and all 213 state legislative seats. But the big question on Election Day in New York State was which party will gain control the State Senate in January 2013.

Democrats picked up two House seats in New York, falling short of taking control of the House. And the question of which party will control the State Senate in the next legislative session remains unclear.



U.S. Senate

As expected, incumbent Democratic U.S. Senator Kirsten Gillibrand easily defeated her challenger, Republican Wendy Long, to win a full six year term. Gillibrand was first appointed to the U.S Senate in 2009 by Governor Paterson, and she was elected in 2010 to serve the last two years of former Senator Hillary Clinton’s term.



U.S. House of Representatives

New York figured prominently in the national battle for control of Congress, with House Democrats looking to pick up seats in order to regain control of the House. But the outcome was not what the Democrats were looking for – they picked up two house seats in New York, but Republicans also gained one seat.

The most competitive House races were:

Congressional District 1 (Eastern Long Island)
Eight-term Democrat Timothy Bishop defeated businessman Randy Altschuler in a rematch of a 2010 race.

Congressional District 11 (Staten Island & Brooklyn)
Incumbent Republican Michael Grimm defeated Democrat Mark Murphy, a former aide to the New York City Public Advocate.

Congressional District 18 (Hudson Valley)
Incumbent Republican Nan Heyworth was defeated by Democrat Sean Patrick Maloney, who was an aide to President Bill Clinton and Governor Eliot Spitzer.

Congressional District 19 (Hudson Valley)
Incumbent Republican Chris Gibson defeated Democrat Julian Schreibman, a former prosecutor.

Congressional District 21 (North Country)
Incumbent Democrat Bill Owens defeated Republican businessman Matt Doheny in a rematch of a 2010 race.

Congressional District 24 (Syracuse area)
Democrat Dan Maffei defeated incumbent Republican Ann Marie Buerkle; Buerkle had defeated then-incumbent Maffei in a very close 2010 race.

Congressional District 25 (Rochester area)
Long-time incumbent Democrat Louise Slaughter withstood a challenge from Monroe County Executive Maggie Brooks.

Congressional District 27 (Western New York)
Former Erie County Executive Chris Collins defeated incumbent Democrat Kathy Hochul, the sole gain for the Republicans this cycle.


State Senate

As it was in 2008 and 2010, the important question of which party will control the State Senate remains unresolved.

Republicans now hold a 33-29 majority in the Senate. Due to redistricting, the Senate will have 63 seats commencing in January. This means that whoever can gain 32 votes can control the Chamber.

The Senate Democrats gained three seats on Election Day, defeating Republican incumbents in Brooklyn and the Hudson Valley, and also winning an open seat in the Rochester area. In a potential fourth pick-up, the Democratic candidate also holds a slight lead in a newly-created district in the Capital Region.

A possible wild card are the members of the Independent Democratic Caucus (IDC). In the wake of their loss of the majority in the 2010 elections, four Democratic Senators broke with their colleagues in early 2011, forming the IDC, and they worked well with the Majority Republicans. Senator Jeff Klein is the IDC leader. These members may not vote for either party leader as majority leader. A fifth newly Senator may also choose not to support the Democratic leadership.

The most competitive State Senate races were:

Senate District 4 (Suffolk County)
Republican Assemblyman Phil Boyle defeated Suffolk County Legislator Rick Montano.

Senate District 15 (Queens)
Incumbent Democrat Joe Addabbo defeated New York City Councilman Eric Ulrich.

Senate District 21 (Brooklyn)
Democrat Simcha Felder easily defeated incumbent Republican David Storobin.

Senate District 37 (Westchester)
Democratic Assemblyman George Latimer defeated businessman Bob Cohen.

Senate District 40 (Hudson Valley)
incumbent Republican Greg Ball is claiming victory over Democrat Justin Wagner; Ball is up by just under 4,000 votes, but Wagner has not conceded the race.

Senate District 41 (Hudson Valley)
Long-time incumbent Republican Steve Saland trails Democrat Terry Gipson by 1,600 votes, with over 7,500 absentee and affidavit ballots to be counted. A Conservative candidate won 14% of the vote, severely hurting Saland.

Senate District 46 (Capital Region)
Democrat Cecilia Tkacyzk leads Republican Assemblyman George Amedore by 139 votes, with more than 7,900 votes outstanding.

Senate District 55 (Rochester area)
Monroe County Legislator Ted O’Brien defeated Assemblyman Sean Hanna.

Senate District 60 (Buffalo area)
incumbent Republican Mark Grisanti cruised to victory over Democrat Mike Amodeo and conservative chuck Swanick.

At this time, the Senate’s 2013 leadership situation is unclear, and is unlikely to be resolved in the immediate future. The winners of the close races listed above will not be known for weeks, as absentee ballots can come in until Nov. 19 and will not be counted until then.


State Assembly

Going into Election Day, Democrats held a huge majority in the 150-member Assembly. The party breakdown was 98 Democrats, 49 Republicans, 1 Independence Party members, and one vacancy.

With their redistricting and spending advantages Democrats picked up a number of seats on Election Day. In January, the Assembly Majority will have 105 seats, Republicans 43, and there is 1 Independen
e Party member who caucuses with the Democrats. One race remains “too close to call.”

Among the high profile Assembly races were:

Assembly District 93 (Westchester)
Democrat David Buchwald defeated incumbent Republican Bob Castelli.

Assembly District 99 (Hudson Valley)
Democrat James Skoufis defeated Republican Roddy Kyle in the race to replace retiring Republican Nancy Calhoun.

Assembly District 111 (Mohawk Valley)
Democrat Angelo Santabarbara defeated republican Tom Quackenbush in the raced to replace Republican George Amedore, who ran for the Senate.

Assembly District 116 (Syracuse area)
Democrat Al Stirpe regained the seat he lost to Republican Don Miller in 2010.

Assembly District 135 (Rochester area)
Republican Mark Johns fended off a tough challenge from Democrat David Koon, who was seeking to retake the seat he held from 1996 until Johns defeated him in 2010.

Assembly District 145 (Niagara County)
Freshman incumbent Republican John Ceretto faced a stiff challenge from Democrat Robert Restaino. Ceretto leads by 900 votes, and Restaino has not conceded



Plugged In @ Hinman Straub

© 2012 Hinman Straub. All rights reserved.

3rd Annual Bronx / Manhattan Region C/STEP College Fair

Committee on Diversity and Multicultural Affairs”

On October 20, 2012, the Associated Medical Schools of New York, along with the Bronx/Manhattan C/STEP Region, the City College of New York and the Mount Sinai School of Medicine hosted the 3rd Annual STEP/CSTEP College Fair.

Held at the City College of New York, the college fair welcomed over 600 New York State STEP students and 200 parents. Students and parents were able to meet with admissions and CSTEP representatives from 50 colleges and universities. In addition, students and parents participated in workshops addressing the college application process, transitioning to college and financial aid.

The Science and Technology Entry Program (STEP) and the Collegiate Science and Technology Program (CSTEP) are opportunity programs funded by the New York State Education Department. Both programs serve a population of highly motivated educationally, economically and underrepresented high-school and college students. These students are interested in entering the fields of science, technology, medicine or the allied health professions.

For more information about STEP and CSTEP, please visit: www.stepforleaders.org.

Meet New York's Next Generation of Physicians

Public Relations Committee”

New York’s medical schools continue to expand their medical school classes as they reaffirm their commitment to training more physicians and providing high quality care to all New York State residents.

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) announced today that a total of 2,230 new medical students enrolled this fall in New York State’s sixteen medical schools. To mark their first steps towards becoming physicians, they participated in ‘white coat ceremonies’ at their institutions, donning the physician’s traditional white coat for the first time.

“This rite of passage is an acknowledgement of the students’ achievements thus far and serves as a symbol of an ongoing commitment to the profession of medicine and the ethical and moral obligations students are expected to uphold,” said Jo Wiederhorn, AMSNY President and Chief Executive Officer.

The tradition of the white coat ceremony began in 1993 at Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons by the Arnold P. Gold Foundation. Dr. Gold, a teacher and pediatric neurologist for more than forty years at Columbia, noted at the 1991 commencement ceremony that students were reciting the Hippocratic Oath “four years too late.” Dr. Gold said medical students should take the Oath when they begin their medical training, as it is during medical school that students make their first contact with patients and thus should be held to a higher standard of practicing medicine ethically and honestly.

New York’s health care landscape is changing rapidly due to an increasingly diverse population, rising costs and policy changes such as the Affordable Care Act. The medical schools in NYS recognize the need to train a more culturally and linguistically competent physician workforce in order to better serve their communities and to accommodate the mounting need for primary care and specialty services.

“The Association of American Medical Colleges estimates that in 2015 the country will have 62,900 fewer doctors than needed,” said Wiederhorn. “And that number will more than double by 2025, as the expansion of insurance coverage and the aging of the ‘baby boomer’ population drive up demand for care. The need for well-trained, highly skilled physicians has never been greater. New York’s medical schools are dedicated to meeting this need.”

Highlights from this year’s new class of medical students include:

  • Albert Einstein College of Medicine of Yeshiva University welcomed 183 students to its Class of 2016. One hundred and fifteen students speak at least one foreign language, 30 play at least one instrument, 24 are trained EMTs and two are Eagle Scouts. Of paramount importance to the consideration of applications is each individual’s involvement in volunteer activities. Students have worked with organizations such as the Save the Children, Habitat for Humanity, Teach for America, the Peace Corps, Engineers Without Borders, Cover Africa and the LGBT Cooperative.
  • Hofstra North Shore-LIJ School of Medicine welcomed 60 students to their Class of 2016. The 32 women and 28 men range in age from 23 to 46 years old and were selected from more than 5,000 applicants.
  • Mount Sinai School of Medicine enrolled 140 students into the Class of 2016. This year was the first year that students received a portable ultrasound device that can visualize internal organs, called the V-Scan, in addition to their traditional stethoscopes. The device was developed by General Electronic Health Care and Mount Sinai is the first medical school in New York to introduce this new technology to their institution. The belief is that the advancement in technology will revolutionize teaching in medicine.
  • NYU School of Medicine welcomed 162 students (75 women and 87 men) to their Class of 2016. They hail from 26 states, plus Canada and represent 73 undergraduate schools. Among the students are an attorney; jazz musician; competitive swimmer; nationally ranked tennis player; professional photographer; wine expert; a gold medal winner in the Massachusetts Junior Olympics and the publisher of The New York Times crossword puzzles.
  • Stony Brook University School of Medicine welcomed 124 new medical students this year, including Marshall Leonard, a former Major League Soccer player from Columbus, GA. In 2012. The School of Medicine received an all-time high of 4,918 applicants.
  • SUNY Downstate Medical Center welcomed 184 new medical students (87 women and 97 men) to their Class of 2016. The age of students ranged from 21 to 39 and they hailed from 76 different undergraduate colleges. Collectively, Downstate’s new class of students speak 40 different languages or dialects, including American sign language, and 114 are first-generation children of immigrants representing 49 countries. The majority of students cited Downstate’s early exposure to clinical training and its location as a major draw, with 53 students coming from local Brooklyn neighborhoods.
  • The School of Medicine and Biomedical Sciences at the University at Buffalo, the State University of New York (SUNY), welcomed a new class of 144 medical students. The class includes 118 New York State residents, 59 from Western New York. Twenty-six are UB graduates. The Class of 2016 has already been recognized for their academic and athletic achievements and their public service. In addition, several students have received fellowships from the NIH and the Howard Hughes Medical Institute.
  • Weill Cornell Medical College welcomed 101 students from 26 states, Canada and Belgium. Twenty percent of their students are from groups under-represented in medicine. More than 60 percent of the student body knows more than one language — five students can speak four — and collectively, they speak 26 different dialects. Many of the students have expressed a commitment to research, global health and population health.

The Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is the State’s voice for medical education. Its members are:

For more information, please contact:
Deborah Fasser
dfasser@corningplace.com


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Are Physicians Prepared to Respond to the Changing Healthcare Landscape?

A conference at the New York Academy of Sciences will focus on how to effectively train physicians and health researchers to provide high-quality, equitable care in light of widespread health disparities.

The American healthcare landscape is changing rapidly due to shifting demographics, rising costs, and policy changes such as the Affordable Care Act. In light of these changes, physicians and clinical researchers are challenged to acquire the necessary tools to provide high-quality, affordable, and equitable care to all. On Tuesday, October 2, representatives from medical schools will convene to discuss Prioritizing Health Disparities in Medical Education to Improve Care, presented by The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation, the Associated Medical Schools of New York, NYU School of Medicine, and the New York Academy of Sciences.

“There is national emphasis on the priorities of reducing healthcare cost and improving quality,” says Marc Nivet, EdD, Chief Diversity Officer, Association of American Medical Colleges. “These are laudable goals, but these efforts alone will not be sufficient to tackle health disparities with deep structural and societal origin. Ensuring a diverse, linguistically and culturally competent clinical and biomedical research workforce must also be a national priority, if we’re serious about health equity.” Nivet will be speaking on the topic of “Diversity as a Driver of Health Equity.”

Reducing inequities in healthcare will require broadening medical training to include health disparities education and research beyond the current focus on race and ethnicity to consider determinants such as socioeconomic status, environmental conditions, gender identity, sexual orientation, behavioral choices, and access to medical care.

“Understanding and correcting health disparities is an important national priority. Educating the next generation of students in this area is essential if we are to achieve that goal,” says George Thibault, MD, President, The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation.

Designed for medical school administrators, policy makers, clinicians, and researchers, and medical students, the conference, to be held at the Academy’s headquarters in New York City, will convene representatives from medical schools that have incorporated emerging health disparities themes into their curricula to discuss three major topics. These topics include:

  • Innovative teaching models for incorporating health disparities research into the curriculum while emphasizing the role of physicians in preserving health;
  • Attracting medical trainees to health disparities research; and
  • Improving the recruitment of underrepresented minority medical students with a health disparities curriculum.

“To adapt the training of 21st century physicians to the ever-changing and increasingly diverse population healthcare landscape, it is critical to not only teach bedside skills for culturally competent care of the individual patient, but also to take the vitals of a family, a neighborhood, or a community linked to that patient in order to address possible barriers to achieving and maintaining optimal health,” says Conference Organizer and Chair Fritz François, MD, MSc, FACG, Associate Dean for Diversity and Academic Affairs, NYU School of Medicine, who will be giving a lecture on “Addressing Health Disparities through Molecular Epidemiology.”

A special panel discussion organized in collaboration with the New York Academy of Sciences’ Science Alliance program will allow medical students from health disparities research programs at various institutions to discuss their own experiences and provide recommendations to further improve student training.

“Now more than ever before there is a clear understanding that cross-cultural medical education is critical in preparing our healthcare workforce to deliver high-quality, equitable care to an increasingly diverse population. Our rapidly changing healthcare system requires that we are all prepared to take care of any patient, at anytime, anywhere—and students recognize this need and are calling for our leadership in preparing them to meet this challenge,” says Conference Chair Joseph Betancourt, MD, MPH, Director, The Disparities Solutions Center, Massachusetts General Hospital, who will be giving a lecture on “Improving Quality and Achieving Equity through Cross-cultural Education.”

“The NYS medical schools are training a diverse and culturally competent workforce that recognizes that part of their collective responsibility is to address issues of access and health equity,” says Jo Wiederhorn, President and CEO of the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY). “AMSNY remains committed to promoting diversity in medicine as a means to eliminate health disparities and significantly improve healthcare outcomes.”

Additional lectures will cover topics such as linking university health resources to social determinants in the community, training medical students to deliver comprehensive LGBT patient care, and health disparities and social justice. A networking reception will follow the conference programming.

For more information, including the full conference agenda, visit www.nyas.org/Disparities.

Media must RSVP to:
Diana Friedman
dfriedman@nyas.org
(212) 298-8645


About The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation
The Josiah Macy Jr. Foundation is a privately endowed philanthropy located in the borough of Manhattan, New York City. The Foundation supports programs designed to improve the education of health professionals in the interest of the health of the public, and to enhance the representation of minorities in the health professions. Visit the Foundation at www.josiahmacyfoundation.org.

About the Associated Medical Schools of New York
Incorporated in 1967, the Associated Medical Schools of New York (AMSNY) is a consortium of the sixteen public and private medical schools in New York State. Working in partnership with its members, AMSNY’s mission is to promote high quality and cost-efficient health care by assuring that the medical schools of New York State can provide outstanding medical education, care, and research. Visit the Associated Medical Schools of New York at www.amsny.org.

About NYU School of Medicine
NYU School of Medicine is one of the nation’s preeminent academic institutions dedicated to achieving world class medical educational excellence. For 170 years, NYU School of Medicine has trained thousands of physicians and scientists who have helped to shape the course of medical history and enrich the lives of countless people. An integral part of NYU Langone Medical Center, the School of Medicine at its core is committed to improving the human condition through medical education, scientific research and direct patient care. Visit NYU School of Medicine at http://school.med.nyu.edu/.

About the New York Academy of Sciences
The New York Academy of Sciences is an independent, not-for-profit organization that since 1817 has been committed to advancing science, technology, and society worldwide. With 25,000 members in 140 countries, the Academy is creating a global community of science for the benefit of humanity. The Academy’s core mission is to advance scientific knowledge, positively impact the major global challenges of society with science-based solutions, and increase the number of scientifically informed individuals in society at large. Please visit us online at www.nyas.org.


For the original press release, click here.
© 2012 The New York Academy of Sciences. All rights reserved.